The artists have there paintings on display at the art gallery. 

russian80

Senior Member
Russian
Does the following sentence make sense:

The artists have there paintings on display at the art gallery. 
 
  • Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The artists have in London paintings on display at the art gallery. 
    You are having an issue with syntax (word order) more than anything else. Try rearranging the words in this sentence. I think you can make this work.
     

    russian80

    Senior Member
    Russian
    You are having an issue with syntax (word order) more than anything else. Try rearranging the words in this sentence. I think you can make this work.
    What about these:
    They moved into the kitchen the chair.
    They moved into the kitchen every chair.
    They moved into the kitchen every stick of furniture.
    They moved into the kitchen every stick of furniture they possessed.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    They moved into the kitchen the chair. :cross:
    They moved the chair into the kitchen.:tick:


    They moved into the kitchen every chair. :cross:
    They moved every chair into the kitchen.:tick:


    They moved into the kitchen every stick of furniture. :cross:
    They moved every stick of furniture into the kitchen.


    They moved into the kitchen every stick of furniture they possessed. :cross:
    They moved every stick of furniture that they possessed into the kitchen.:tick:
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    They moved into the kitchen (okay, so now they are in the kitchen) the chair. (What about the chair?)
     

    russian80

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The sentence "They moved into the kitchen every stick of furniture they possessed." is listed in A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language as perfectly fine.
     

    heypresto

    Senior Member
    English - England
    It's not grammatically wrong, but it's very unidiomatic. In 99.625% of contexts we would say 'They moved every stick of furniture they possessed into the kitchen.' This is natural idiomatic English.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    My father called home one evening and told my mother that he would be late coming home, "I am in traffic court". (Apparently he was given a traffic violation.)

    My mother, relying on the syntax she often hear at home from her immigrant parents told us, "Your father is going to be late for dinner; he is caught in traffic." :)

    Syntax (word order) is important in English; probably more so than other languages that have more rigorous grammar.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    They moved into the kitchen (okay, so now they are in the kitchen) the chair. (What about the chair?)
    Garden-path sentence - Wikipedia
    A garden-path sentence is a grammatically correct sentence that starts in such a way that a reader's most likely interpretation will be incorrect; the reader is lured into a parse that turns out to be a dead end or yields a clearly unintended meaning.
     
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