the authors "question" the rationale behind

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Roundhouse

Senior Member
Bengali
In a report, there is this sentence: "we question the rationale behind offering longer EI benefits to workers in regions with higher unemployment rates. Higher unemployment rates do not necessarily translate into longer durations of unemployment." The authors then cite examples to support their point in the second sentence.

I need to know what are other ways to talk about this if I were not to use the word "question".

Original: ... the authors question the rationale behind something ...

Here, "question" means "to express doubts about the value or truth of something" (Cambridge). I am wondering if this can be rephrased in the following ways keeping the meaning intact.

Rephrase A: ... the authors find no logical/principled rationale behind something ...

Rephrase B: ... the authors find no clear rationale behind something ...

Are A and B equivalent to the original?
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    A and B seem say the authors are sure it is untrue (to the best of their knowledge), not that they have doubts (that they are unsure if it is true).
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Questioning" the existence of something doesn't suggest that it can not exist. It only suggests that its existence is open to doubt. Your rephrases are too strong.
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    Here, "question" means "to express doubts about the value or truth of something" (Cambridge). I am wondering if this can be rephrased in the following ways keeping the meaning intact.

    Rephrase A: ... the authors find no logical/principled rationale behind something ...

    Rephrase B: ... the authors find no clear rationale behind something ...

    Are A and B equivalent to the original?
    No - not for me. Your rephrased versions are too specific; this idea may be included in the reasons for questioning the rationale, but the verb doesn't explicitly mean that. If you're questioning a rationale, it doesn't mean that you automatically reject it. It means that you're raising doubts about its general validity and applicability.

    [cross-posted]
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    "Doubt" or any of its synonyms would work.
    I was referring to the original author's phrasing with this suggestion, and not to Roundhouse's suggestions, which I agree seem to overstate the original's intent.
     

    Roundhouse

    Senior Member
    Bengali
    @Packard @manfy @The Newt @Myridon Hi all, I am wondering if the following option better reflects the original.

    Rephrase C: ... the authors express serious doubts about the general validity and applicability of offering longer duration of benefits in regions of higher unemployment.

    I say this is an improvement over A and B, but does it closely explain the original?
     
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