the baby's cry woke me

epistolario

Senior Member
Tagalog
Quería traducir la siguiente frase:

The baby's cry woke me out of a deep sleep.

Aquí están mis intentos:

El lloro del niño me despertó de un sueño muy profundo.​
El vagido del niño me despertó de un sueño muy profundo.​

¿Las dos están bien?
 
  • elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    In English it should be "the baby's crying woke me from a deep sleep."

    In Spanish I would say "Me desperté ... por el bebé/el niño que lloraba." Let's see what natives say.
     
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    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    ¿El llanto del bebé?

    De nuestro diccionario (pestaña Collins):

    se oía el llanto de un niño en la otra habitación - you could hear a child crying in the next room

    EDIT
    'The baby's cry' could also be correct in the situation where the baby suddenly squealed or screamed (in pain or fright, perhaps).
    @epistolario, please explain the situation (context).
     
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    epistolario

    Senior Member
    Tagalog
    Thanks. Let's say the neighbor was sleeping profoundly when he heard the loud cry of a newborn baby (two months old) in an adjacent house in the middle of the night. He struggled to go back to sleep, and it took him a couple of hours to do that. His wife asked him why he looked sleepy while they were having breakfast.

    I just want to confirm if Spanish speakers interchangeably use vagido and lloro in that situation.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    when he heard the loud cry of a newborn baby (two months old) in an adjacent house in the middle of the night.
    Again, “crying,” not “cry.” The noun “cry” doesn’t have to do with “llorar” (see @Bevj’s comment).
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    I'm still not clear as to the context.
    I agree with elroy: if the baby kept him awake for a long period of time, the word is crying, not cry (llanto).
    If the baby screamed once, this could be a cry (un grito).
    Lloro I think is wrong.
    Vagido seems to be a very specific cry and not appropriate to this context.
     

    Bakauata

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Castellano Buenos Aires)
    El llanto del bebé me sacó (despertó) de un sueño profundo = The baby's cry woke me out of a deep sleep.

    El bebé que lloraba me sacó de un sueño profundo = the baby's crying woke me from a deep sleep.

    "Lloro" no creo que sea correcto. No es un sustantivo. "El llorar del bebé" puede ser, pero no creo que alguien lo diga naturalmente.

    "Vagido" nunca lo escuché, pero debe ser por regionalidad.
     

    Mister Draken

    Senior Member
    Castellano (Argentina)
    In English it should be "the baby's crying woke me from a deep sleep."

    In Spanish I would say "Me desperté ... por el bebé/el niño que lloraba." Let's see what natives say.

    No es incorrecta la frase. pero suena mejor "Me desperté por el llanto de mi hijo". O "Me desperté porque mi hijo estaba llorando/lloraba".

    En tu frase "por" indica causa. Eso está bien; sin embargo no se sabe si ese niño estaba en tu casa o en la del vecino (o en otra parte).

    ¿En inglés se entiende que es el hijo de quien habla?
     

    Bakauata

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Castellano Buenos Aires)
    I'm still not clear as to the context.
    I agree with elroy: if the baby kept him awake for a long period of time, the word is crying, not cry (llanto).
    If the baby screamed once, this could be a cry (un grito).
    Lloro I think is wrong.
    Vagido seems to be a very specific cry and not appropriate to this context.
    Just for clarity, I'm going with the original phrase which is: The baby's cry woke me out of a deep sleep. Further down there is a post from the OP explaining that the man "[he] had struggled to go back to sleep, and it took him a couple of hours to do that."
    It doesn't say the baby had cried more than that one cry, nor that it had been a persistent disturbance.
    So I agree that cry and crying are different, and believe that llanto and llorar are the closest words in spanish.
    However, I think llanto can be used for a continuous cry (sorry) as in crying or llorando.
    And cry could be grito, but a baby wouldn't shout.
     

    Bakauata

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Castellano Buenos Aires)
    No. Tal como explicó elroy en aportes 2 y 5, no se usa 'cry' en inglés de esta manera.
    Again, “crying,” not “cry.” The noun “cry” doesn’t have to do with “llorar”.

    Sorry, I don't mean to be annoying, but I found this definition of cry, as a noun, on wordreference.com. By this I don't mean to say the original usage in this thread is correct. I'm just putting it out there for your consideration.

    cry ninformal (weeping) (CR, familiar)llorada nf
    (ES)llorera nf
    llanto nm
    I had a good cry at the end of that movie.
     
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    OtroLencho

    Senior Member
    English - Western US
    Sorry, I don't mean to be annoying, but I found this definition of cry as a noun on wordreference.com. By this I don't mean to say the original usage in this thread is correct. I'm just putting it out there for your consideration.

    I had a good cry at the end of that movie.
    Lo que no es el mismo contexto que en el post original, donde yo lo interpreto como un solo grito, no un llanto continuo. El hecho que no podía conciliar el sueño después, no contradice eso.

    Edit: Al pensarlo más, creo que "have a [good] cry" es la frase hecha que se traduce en "llanto", de otra manera es más bien un grito.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Indeed, the dictionary example is a different use of the word "cry" -- and there it does work to refer to "llorar"! I assumed @epistolario meant "crying" because he suggested "lloro." I still think that's what he meant and "cry" was just a word choice error.
     

    Bakauata

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Castellano Buenos Aires)
    I know I may be testing some people's patience with this, but Merriam-Webster defines cry(n) as : a fit of weeping, and the Oxford Learner's gives "a baby's cries" as an example.
     

    Lyrica_Soundbite

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Argentina
    Eso yo lo habría dicho así: "el bebé del vecino me despertó a mitad de la noche, de golpe empezó a llorar, justo cuando yo ya estaba en el quinto sueño". Si dijera simplemente "el bebé me despertó...", estaría dando a entender que el bebé es nuestro.
    Ni "lloro" ni "vagido" escuché nunca decir. "Llanto" sí.

    Concuerdo en que en ese contexto, "the (neighbours') baby's cry" suena a que soltó un único grito de golpe.
     

    epistolario

    Senior Member
    Tagalog
    In this imaginary example, the baby cried in the middle of the night, just like what other normal babies do, because he's hungry. He will cry for a couple of minutes until you give him the bottle with milk. The parent or nanny will hurriedly prepare the bottle to make him stop crying, which is his way of saying that he's hungry.

    With regard to the neighbor, some people who have sleeping problems struggle to go back to sleep after waking up in the middle of the night.
     

    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    In this imaginary example, the baby cried in the middle of the night, just like what other normal babies do, because he's hungry. He will cry for a couple of minutes until you give him the bottle with milk. The parent or nanny will hurriedly prepare the bottle to make him stop crying, which is his way of saying that he's hungry.
    That's what I thought. So the baby's crying, not the baby's cry, woke them up.

    Merriam-Webster defines cry(n) as : a fit of weeping, and the Oxford Learner's gives "a baby's cries" as an example.
    "the baby's cries" sounds okay to me. "The baby's cry [meaning 'crying'] woke me up" does not. :(
     

    Bakauata

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Castellano Buenos Aires)
    That's what I thought. So the baby's crying, not the baby's cry, woke them up.


    "the baby's cries" sounds okay to me. "The baby's cry [meaning 'crying'] woke me up" does not. :(
    Thanks. I really wasn't trying to be obnoxious. And I do get your point, and your response does clarify things for me.
     
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