The bank’s board of directors

Van Veen

Member
Russian
Hello all,

Which do you think sounds better:

a. the Bank’s Board of Directors;
b. the Board of the Bank’s Directors;
c. the Board of Directors of the Bank.

Personally I don’t see where the word “bank” should go: the directors in question are all part of the Bank and the board they form is part of the bank too. My last option doesn’t seem ambiguous but, on the other hand, it seems to me a tad cumbersome.

Native help will be highly appreciated.

Thank you!
 
  • Sharifa345

    Senior Member
    USA
    US English, DR Spanish
    Hello all,

    Which do you think sounds better:

    a. the Bank’s Board of Directors; :tick:
    b. the Board of the Bank’s Directors; :cross:
    c. the Board of Directors of the Bank. :cross:

    Personally I don’t see where the word “bank” should go: the directors in question are all part of the Bank and the board they form is part of the bank too. My last option doesn’t seem ambiguous but, on the other hand, it seems to me a tad cumbersome.

    Native help will be highly appreciated.

    Thank you!
    "Board of Directors" is a collective group. You should not split up the words. A and C are equivalent, but in English it is much more common to use the possessive with 's when meaning is not obstructed.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    My view is different from those given above: both (a) and (c) are fine by me:
    a. the Bank’s Board of Directors;:tick:
    b. the Board of the Bank’s Directors;:confused:
    c. the Board of Directors of the Bank.:tick:
    Whether I would use (a) or (c) would depend on the context and the rhythm of the sentence.
     

    Van Veen

    Member
    Russian
    My view is different from those given above: both (a) and (c) are fine by me:

    Whether I would use (a) or (c) would depend on the context and the rhythm of the sentence.
    Which do you think would fit the context of a formal document better?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Could you

    • tell us more about the document (who the audience is, for example - the bank's employees? )
    • provide the sentence you want to use it in and the sentences that lead up to it, up to a maximum of four sentences in total?
     

    Van Veen

    Member
    Russian
    Could you

    • tell us more about the document (who the audience is, for example - the bank's employees? )
    • provide the sentence you want to use it in and the sentences that lead up to it, up to a maximum of four sentences in total?
    I need it for a formal document intended for a bank's shareholders. The sentences I want to use it in go:

    The Bank’s Board of Directors shall exercise the general management of the Bank’s operations except for issues which fall within the authority of the General Meeting of Shareholders. Issues within the authority of the Board of Directors may not be referred to the Chairman of the Bank’s Management Board or the Bank’s Management Board.

    So it's pretty formal I think.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Many thanks, Van Veen. I think you could use either in that context. But if you used the Board of Directors of the Bank you'd really also need to say the Chairman of the Management Board of the Bank or the Management Board of the Bank. And that's starting to sound a bit "heavy". So I'd probably opt for The Bank's... throughout.

    This is an issue of style rather than grammar, of course:).
     

    Van Veen

    Member
    Russian
    Many thanks, Van Veen. I think you could use either in that context. But if you used the Board of Directors of the Bank you'd really also need to say the Chairman of the Management Board of the Bank or the Management Board of the Bank. And that's starting to sound a bit "heavy". So I'd probably opt for The Bank's... throughout.

    This is an issue of style rather than grammar, of course:).
    Thank you, Loob!
     
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