The bearing of her onward was her abandonment to him.

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zc0000

New Member
Chinese
The bearing of her onward was her abandonment to him.


What does this sentence mean ? What does "onward" stand for in this context?


I want to make a deep sense of english words now. I really want someone to explain these word-grammar related issues. Thanks.
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    Hello, zc0000, and welcome to the forum. We need some background and context in order to answer your question.

    You may quote up to four lines of the original document as context. It would also help to have some background. Who wrote this? What is the situation?

    This is not common, everyday English, in my experience. It sounds very poetic. I could make a guess but it would most likely be wrong. One of the main guidelines here is to provide background and context. It cuts down on guesswork and provides you with a more accurate answer.
     

    Jaseis

    Member
    English - England
    We definitely need more context here. Are you sure the punctuation is correct?
    I expect onward is being used as a noun and as JamesM said, it sounds very poetic.
    However, I can't work out if it's an adverb.

    ...........
    The bearing of her, onward was her abandonment to him. maybe?

    Confusing indeed.
     

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    Googling the phrase is enlightening :)
    This link shows that 'the bearing of her onward' refers to a lady being driven by her husband in a horse-drawn carriage, at which time she was in total awe of him.
     

    zc0000

    New Member
    Chinese
    Thanks for so many replies. The forum activates beyond my expectation. As for the sentence I just grab it from a dictionary entry. It is just for exemplifying the usage of "onward" , therefore no context info wraps around. Bevj did a good job of addressing it on the web so we may get enlightened.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Now I'm curious as to what possible dictionary could give you a sentence like that for the use of "onward"?
    I think I've found the dictionary, Copyright: click.

    It's not, as others have said, a particularly helpful example, zc0000:eek: But "onward" does have the adverb meaning given in the dictionary entry:
    adverb In a direction or toward a position that is ahead in space or time; forward.
    The bearing of her onward = bearing her onward = carrying her forward.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    I think I've found the dictionary, Copyright: click.

    It's not, as others have said, a particularly helpful example, zc0000:eek:
    How cruel... this language is tough enough to learn without this sort of help.

    Thanks very much for the link.

    But "onward" does have the adverb meaning given in the dictionary entry:
    Bearing her onward = carrying her forward.
    Yes, indeed.
     
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