"the Beaver" Cleaver

NewAmerica

Banned
Mandarin
"The Beaver" is put in quote marks and I don't know whether it has a particular sense of humor. Does it sound completely decent or neutral? Or does it have a hint of sexutal connotation as you know the word "beaver" has several meanings and the sexual connotation is among them. It is Chinese character ri, in one context it is completely decent, dignified and grand, and in another it has strong sexual connocation.

***************************
Theodore "the Beaver" Cleaver is the fictional title character in the American television series Leave It to Beaver. Originally played by Jerry Mathers, seven-year-old ("almost eight") Beaver is the son of June and Ward Cleaver (Barbara Billingsley and Hugh Beaumont) and the brother of 13-year-old Wally Cleaver (Tony Dow).

Source:
Beaver Cleaver - Wikipedia
 
  • grassy

    Senior Member
    Polish

    NewAmerica

    Banned
    Mandarin
    Is thus a nickname decent and dignified?
    Do you know what beaver means in a particular context?

    Thank you
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Is thus a nickname decent and dignified?
    I wouldn't describe them as that, exactly. They are typically humorous, and occasionally rude.
    Do you know what beaver means in a particular context?
    Well, in your particular context this is explained in the wikipedia article you named as your source:
    Origin of the name Beaver
    It is during the course of the last episode the viewer learns how the Beaver got his nickname. In a 2006 interview, Jerry Mathers,[1] stated that series creator Joe Connelly, had a shipmate in the U.S. Merchant Marine named Beaver and simply liked the name. It was not until the finale that the writers invented an explanation for the nickname; i.e., as a young child, Wally mispronounced Beaver's given name - Theodore - as "Tweeter" and this become "Beaver." Mathers opined that after 6 years and 234 episodes, the writers could have come up with a better origin story.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    (a) If a known womanizer were to be nicknamed the Beaver Cleaver, then I would see this as a very crude reference to his sexual promiscuity.

    (b) In the context you have given, of a 7-year-old boy, that clearly cannot be the case. Instead we can imagine that his friends/family have simply given him a nickname that rhymes with his surname and has no other significance.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    In US slang, a "beaver" is the female genital area -

    OED: 2. a. The female genitals or the pubic area in general; also attributive, denoting films, literature, etc., in which nude females are portrayed; [...] Chiefly U.S.
    1927 Immortalia 166 She took off her clothes From her head to her toes, And a voice at the keyhole yelled, ‘Beaver!’
    1976 Listener 12 Feb. 180/1 Like the beaver mags (Kurt Vonnegut's word for the glossies that concentrate on the female pudenda), television has only a limited number of shots with which to titillate the viewer.
    1981 M. Gee Dying, in Other Words 101 He hadn't been very intelligent..showing him the skin flick picture of Moira…It was probably too dirty, they can't use beaver shots, although she was cracked up her beaver, Macbeth felt it briefly.

    "A beaver cleaver" is a slang name for the penis, or a man who makes a lot of sexual conquests. beaver-cleaver (The free dictionary.com)

    I suspect that the person who first named "Theodore "the Beaver" Cleaver" was blissfully unaware of this.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    As I recall, Leave it to Beaver was sickeningly clean-cut. Any kind of sexual reference would have been unthinkable. If 'beaver cleaver' has come into use with a rude meaning, it's from this show, not vice versa.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    If there were ever a list of chaste TV shows, Leave it to Beaver (along with "Lassie") would probably top that list. So I agree with Entangled that this show would not have included a double entendre in any of its scripts to the effect of "beaver cleaver".
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    In US slang, a "beaver" is the female genital area -

    OED: 2. a. The female genitals or the pubic area in general; also attributive, denoting films, literature, etc., in which nude females are portrayed; [...] Chiefly U.S.
    1927 Immortalia 166 She took off her clothes From her head to her toes, And a voice at the keyhole yelled, ‘Beaver!’
    The citation from Immortalia is actually a reference to a strange game that was a brief craze of the 1920s (and especially 1922) in which people watched for bearded men. (Note that by 1922, beards had passed out of fashion for Bright Young Things; only older men whose youths were spent in Victorian days still sported them.) When a man with a beard was spotted, the first person to see him yelled "Beaver!", and scored a point. This was originally an English game, with its origins apparently at Oxford, although it did spread to America. The term "beaver" thus was used as a synonym for a beard. In this case, the cheeky person peering in at the keyhole is playing the game under somewhat altered rules.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Nicknames are often (usually?) included in quotes.

    St. Louis: Stan "The Man" Musial Represented All That Was Good About Baseball
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top