The best dish of/in the restaurant

prudent260

Senior Member
Chinese
Jonathan Gold's 10 best dishes of 2016
But what may be the best dish in the restaurant comes from seaside Genoa, and isn't even on the menu — farinata.


The restaurant's best dish is farinata. The best dish of the restaurant is farinata.
There are the sentences in my mind.

But the sentence in the article used the best dish in the restaurant.

Are they (of/in) both idiomatic? Or is one simply wrong in this scenario?

Thank you
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    I can well imagine a dish of farinata, or a dish of herbs where love is, but a dish of a restaurant? A bit heavy for my digestion! Perhaps if it were gingerbread?

    30968




    Almost always, we use in with superlatives: "The tallest mountain in Europe... the oldest man in Britain... the latest hit in the pop charts..."
     

    prudent260

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I can well imagine a dish of farinata, or a dish of herbs where love is, but a dish of a restaurant? A bit heavy for my digestion! Perhaps if it were gingerbread?

    View attachment 30968



    Almost always, we use in with superlatives: "The tallest mountain in Europe... the oldest man in Britain... the latest hit in the pop charts..."
    Thank you for the visual explanation.
    Thank you, everyone, for helping.

    :) :idea:
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    I can well imagine a dish of farinata, or a dish of herbs where love is, but a dish of a restaurant? A bit heavy for my digestion!
    Have you tried Digestive or Swedish Bitters, Keith? :)

    Interestingly Google has very few listings for both ‘of’ and ‘in’. “The restaurant’s best dish” is a lot more popular.
     
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