The biscuit stuck in my teeth.

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alberttim

Senior Member
Chinese
I gave him a biscuit.

The inner biscuit was a bit sticky.

It's stick on his teeth.

He started upset and told me.

"The biscuit stuck in my teeth."

What preposition should I use, if the thing stuck between 2 tooth?
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I might say 'The biscuit stuck between my teeth', or more likely, 'The biscuit is stuck between my teeth.'

    If the biscuit was sticky and stuck onto the surface of my teeth, I would say 'The biscuit stuck on my teeth'. (Actually, candy is more likely to stick on your teeth than a biscuit is.)
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    What do you mean by 'inner biscuit', alberttim? Are you talking about the filling of a biscuit sandwich (like the cream in in biscuits below)?


    If so, I find it difficult to imagine the filling stuck between the teeth. They might stick on or behind the teeth or on the gums. I imagine something fibrous (like a bit of meat or vegetable) stuck between teeth.
     

    alberttim

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    What do you mean by 'inner biscuit', alberttim? Are you talking about the filling of a biscuit sandwich (like the cream in in biscuits below)?


    If so, I find it difficult to imagine the filling stuck between the teeth. They might stick on or behind the teeth or on the gums. I imagine something fibrous (like a bit of meat or vegetable) stuck between teeth.
    When you chew into small pieces, sometimes the biscuit will too sticky and stick between teeth.
     

    alberttim

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I might say 'The biscuit stuck between my teeth', or more likely, 'The biscuit is stuck between my teeth.'

    If the biscuit was sticky and stuck onto the surface of my teeth, I would say 'The biscuit stuck on my teeth'. (Actually, candy is more likely to stick on your teeth than a biscuit is.)
    Why is past tense use in here?
    If the biscuit is still there. Should I say ," The biscuit stick on my teeth."?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    When you chew into small pieces, sometimes the biscuit will too sticky and stick between teeth.
    Do you mean "between two teeth", i.e in the space between two adjacent teeth? Or do you mean "on a tooth" or "on my teeth" (on the surface of your teeth)?

    As Natkretep said, things like meat or vegetables are more likely to get lodged between your teeth. Sticky things like chewed biscuits or chocolate can get stuck on (the surface of) your teeth.
    Why is past tense use in here?
    Because it has happened, and is in the past.
    If the biscuit is still there. Should I say ," The biscuit stick on my teeth."?
    You could say: (A bit of) The biscuit is stuck on my teeth.
     
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