The bridesmaid but rarely the bride for this award

rich7

Senior Member
Venezuela español
Atlanta's Bobby Cox, often the bridesmaid but rarely the bride for this award, did perhaps his finest job in capturing his 14th straight division title with a team comprised largely of rookies. St. Louis' Tony La Russa and Houston's Phil Garner, whose team rebounded from 15-30 to the World Series, will challenge.


What's the entire meaning of this expression?
 
  • Buddha

    Member
    USA - English
    rich7 said:
    often the bridesmaid but rarely the bride

    What's the entire meaning of this expression?
    Often the bridesmaid, but rarely (never) the bride literally refers to a woman that has been in many weddings, but never seems to be able to get married (be the bride) herself.

    The figurative meaning of this phrase is someone who constantly gets close to achieving a goal, but never quite makes it. So in the paragraph above, I would say that Bobby Cox has often come quite close to winning an award, but never quite seems to make it. However, this time, he did win. I don't think it is referring to division titles, since this is his "14th straight" title. What award is the paragraph talking about? If it is only a division title, it seems a bad metaphor for the writer to use since he's won 14 straight.

    Buddha
     

    fenixpollo

    moderator
    American English
    As buddha so succinctly says it, "Always a bridesmaid, never a bride" is a set phrase and a common lament of single women who want to get married.
     

    E-J

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Yes. The phrase also conveys the idea of being in the spotlight - the most significant person among all the others at an event, the one who everyone is looking at.
     

    ctin

    Member
    Mexico
    What i think it means is that he is always the bridesmaid as in always in the playoffs (weddings) , but never the bride as in never world series champ.
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    ctin said:
    What i think it means is that he is always the bridesmaid as in always in the playoffs (weddings) , but never the bride as in never world series champ.
    Hi ctin,

    I tend to disagree. If you look at the construction of the sentence, it states very clearly:

    ...often the bridesmaid but rarely the the bride for this award, ...
     

    ctin

    Member
    Mexico
    Yes the sentence does not give alot of information
    So it doe not say which award, him being in the playoffs 14 times in my opinion would mean the award would be a world series ring?

    But then again, im not sure how many times he has won the manager of the year award either, so it might be that award they are talking about.
    As in he is always the runner-up.
     

    nycphotography

    Senior Member
    American English
    ctin said:
    Don't think so, he did not make it that far in the play-offs to be considered.
    did perhaps his finest job in capturing his 14th straight division title with a team comprised largely of rookies

    Seems to imply that he made it at least to winning the division title.

    Although Bobby Cox is the manager (I just remembered), so MVP is ruled out for a different reason.

    Now I wonder what award they could be talking about?
     

    ctin

    Member
    Mexico
    I say the award they are talking about is the Manager of the Year Award, what other award can three managers be in the running for, Bobby Cox, Phil Garner, and Tony La Russa.
     

    TrentinaNE

    Senior Member
    USA
    English (American)
    In particular, Manager of the Year for the National Baseball League. There's a separate award for the American Baseball League.
     
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