, the caption beneath it ran [ part of speech]

egiu

Senior Member
Chinese
BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU, the caption beneath it ran.
1984 by George Orwell

What is the part of the part of speech of the part in bold?
And I am not sure it is a phrase of clause too.
 
  • egiu

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It's a verb. Past tense of run.
    Sorry. Maybe I didn't ask the question well. In this sentence, the caption beneath it ran modifies the caption BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU. I want to know the part of speech of the caption beneath it ran as a whole.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    The bold sentence is the main/matrix clause. Of course, it is a noun phrase andn a verb, as E2E4 says... It is the Big Brother... phrase that modifies that main clause...
     

    egiu

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    A noun phrase + a verb (ran). (?)
    Oh, I didn't realise this. Thank you.
    These findings, we would suggest, cast doubt upon his hypothesis.
    So in the sentence above what is the part of speech of we would suggest?
    Somehow I think it serves as an adverb.
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    A clause is not a part of speech.

    "the" is an article.
    "caption" is a noun.
    "beneath" is a preposition.
    "it" is a pronoun.
    "ran" is a verb.

    You have here a description of words on a poster. It is the exact same structure as the following:
    "Excuse me, this is my station", the man standing next to Laura said.
    "Venite adoremus", the choir sang.


    You can also move the verb:
    "Excuse me, this is my station", said the man standing next to Laura.
    "Venite Adoremus", sang the choir.
    "Big Brother is Watching You", ran the caption beneath it.

    It is entirely a matter of stylistic choice -- and I would say Orwell made the right choice, because it just sounds better that way.
     
    Last edited:

    egiu

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    The bold sentence is the main/matrix clause. Of course, it is a noun phrase andn a verb, as E2E4 says... It is the Big Brother... phrase that modifies that main clause...
    These findings, we would suggest, cast doubt upon his hypothesis.
    What is the main cause of this sentence?
    These findings cast doubt upon his hypothesis. We would suggest ?
    I am confused now. I think We would suggest and the caption beneath it ran are the same in some sense.
     

    egiu

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    A clause is not a part of speech.

    "the" is an article.
    "caption" is a noun.
    "beneath" is a preposition.
    "it" is a pronoun.
    "ran" is a verb.

    You have here a description of words on a poster. It is the exact same structure as the following:
    "Excuse me, this is my station", the man standing next to Laura said.
    "Venite adoremus", the choir sang.


    You can also move the verb:
    "Excuse me, this is my station", said the man standing next to Laura.
    "Venite Adoremus", sang the choir.
    "Big Brother is Watching You", ran the caption beneath it.

    It is entirely a matter of stylistic choice -- and I would say Orwell made the write choice, because it just sounds better that way.
    Thank you. I really mixed them up.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    A subject complement or an object? That is the question. All would depend on whether we see 'run' as a transitive or intransitive verb. I think I tend to see it as a transitive verb, so the other phrase is probably an object... :confused: Or maybe an intransitive verb... This one is confusing. :)
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    A subject complement or an object? That is the question. All would depend on whether we see 'run' as a transitive or intransitive verb. I think I tend to see it as a transitive verb, so the other phrase is probably an object... :confused: Or maybe an intransitive verb... This one is confusing. :)
    I have changed my mind. I agree now with E2E4 - 'run' must be intransitive so the phrase in question is operhaps a subject complement...
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I have changed my mind. I agree now with E2E4 - 'run' must be intransitive so the phrase in question is operhaps a subject complement...
    I had deleted my suggestion of subject complement (not being well up on such terms), but I'm glad someone else agrees with me. I see no difference between "the text ran/said/read + <text>", so I don't see ran as a transitive verb.
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    I see no difference between "the text ran/said/read + <text>", so I don't see ran as a transitive verb.
    These things can be complicated... Say something. That something looks like an object. But in our example 'run' has begun to sound to me intransitive. :)
     
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