The car was using the left blinker.

nagomi

Senior Member
Korean
Context: You are about to cross the road at an intersection, and a car is coming towards you, but with the light indicating which direction the driver wishes to turn is on. It is the left.

Question: How do you mean the bold in a sentence?

Model: "The car was using the left blinker. So I thought it was going to turn to its left."
 
  • I would say "The car had the left indicator on" or "The left indicator of the car was engaged". I would't say "the car was using the left indicator". In fact cars don't normally use anything, it is their drivers that use parts of the cars' equipment.
     
    Could you rephrase this?
    What is the source of "The car was using the left blinker"?
    That's my model. It's not from somewhere else. I would've included the source, it it were.

    Let me rephrase:

    Every regular car has two specific-purposed lights on the front and on the back as well, which are used to show which direction the driver wishes to turn to at a corner or an intersection so that other drivers or people recognize their signal and respond accordingly. I called one of the lights fitted on the left hand side of the car's front as "the left blinker."
     
    Thanks. In "How do you mean the bold in a sentence?", the verb "mean" is wrongly used.

    In BE, "The car was using the left blinker", "blinker" is old-fashioned and very "non-technical" - something a child might say, or someone who has no knowledge at all of cars.

    The usual way of expressing it in BE would be "The car had its left indicator flashing/on."
     
    That's my model.
    Ah: that explains Model: "The car was using the left blinker. So I thought it was going to turn to its left." - I thought "Model" was the speaker - someone who was, by profession, a fashion model.
     
    I would say "The car had the left indicator on" or "The left indicator of the car was engaged". I would't say "the car was using the left indicator". In fact cars don't normally use anything, it is their drivers that use parts of the cars' equipment.
    Djmc is being too literal. We all use these shorthand expressions in everyday life, and I for one see nothing unusual about "the car was using its left indicator/flasher/blinker".

    What I would choose, however, would be "The car had its left indicator on, so I thought it was going to turn to the left (my right)." Its left sounds strange, but without it the phrase my right is useful to make the point clear.
     
    In my American English I would say,

    "The car had its left blinker on so I thought it was going to turn left."

    The driver turned the blinker on but we often speak as if the car is operating itself ("the car turned left").

    There is no need to say "its left". We always talk about the movement and turns of a car relative to its own direction of travel.

    The other common term here for blinker is "turn signal". It could be substituted above.
     
    ...There is no need to say "its left". We always talk about the movement and turns of a car relative to its own direction of travel...
    Ooh! Big assumption there! If I was on oath in a court of law, describing the movements of vehicles involved in an accident, I'd want to be a bit more precise than that.
     
    Ooh! Big assumption there! If I was on oath in a court of law, describing the movements of vehicles involved in an accident, I'd want to be a bit more precise than that.
    The information is given in "so I thought it was going to turn left". If its right blinker was on, you (hopefully) wouldn't have thought that.
     
    If I was looking at it coming towards me, its left blinker would be to my right. Its left turn would be to my right.

    Come on! I know mary many people who have difficulty telling their own left from right, before you introduce another vehicle into the calculation! :D
     
    I stand by what I said. Everything moving forward has a natural left and right. No car turns to your left. It turns left by turning it's steering wheel to the left. It doesn't matter what angle you're watching it from - from behind, from in front or from the side. A car making a left turn is the same from any angle. The turn, in the case of an American car, is in the direction of the driver's seat.
     
    P.S. I'd only expect a driver of a horse to be using blinkers
    images
     
    In the US, indicator lights are the ones on the dashboard indicating that the engine is overheating, the oil pressure is low, etc.
     
    Back
    Top