The caribou go extinct

amismael

Member
Arabic
Pleas! If I said "The caribou go extinct", does that mean that the caribou are in the process of extinction (i.e. they are about to be extinct due to their low numbers), or that the caribou have already been extinct? And more generally, is that expression (go+adjective) for the past, present, or the near future?
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    And more generally, is that expression (go+adjective) for the past, present, or the near future?
    It's the sort of sentence you'd expect to hear in a historical narrative, describing each event as it happens. The Ice Age starts to end. A new species of wolf starts to evolve. The caribou go extinct.
     

    amismael

    Member
    Arabic
    It's the sort of sentence you'd expect to hear in a historical narrative, describing each event as it happens. The Ice Age starts to end. A new species of wolf starts to evolve. The caribou go extinct.
    There is no narrative context. It is a calculus question, and I need to represent the statement "The caribou go extinct" mathematically. So, I need to understand: when I hear that expression, should I expect that there are caribou (but with small numbers) or there are not???
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Because the Arctic moss is being destroyed, the caribou are going extinct. [= There are few left.] When the last of the moss dies [= an event in the future], the caribou go extinct. [= Now there are none.]
     
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