The catenary arch can be built with a very thin material thickness.

panevino

Senior Member
spanish and catalan - Spain
What is the right way to say this?


The catenary arch can be built with/from/using a very thin material thickness.
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    The catenary arch can be built with/from/using a very thin material thickness.
    I'd drop "thickness".

    The catenary arch can be built with very thin material.
    The catenary arch can be built using very thin material.


    I wouldn't use "from" here.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Depending on the exact situation, you might need to keep "material thickness" to ensure the meaning is clear, in which case use "with".

    Barque's suggestions undoubtedly sound better in everyday English, but I expect it is more important to avoid confusion and ambiguity than to sound elegant.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    My problem with this is that catenary arches were originally made from stone. Nowadays some are made from welded stainless steel. So what are "thin materials"?



    The gateway arch in St. Louis is made from stainless steel--so it the steel thin, or is the structure thin?

     

    gnommero

    Member
    Italian - Italy
    Catalan vaults follow a catenary profile and are built with few layers of very thin plain bricks
     

    panevino

    Senior Member
    spanish and catalan - Spain
    Thank you from all your replies. I am not referring to historic constructions of catenary arches but more comparing a catenary arch with a semi-circular one. For this reason, I can just generally say that "the catenary arch can be built with a very thin material thickness."
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Thank you from all your replies. I am not referring to historic constructions of catenary arches but more comparing a catenary arch with a semi-circular one. For this reason, I can just generally say that "the catenary arch can be built with a very thin material thickness."
    Or, "Catenary arches can be built with far thinner materials than semi-circular arches."

    Again, I am not certain that "thin" is the right word.
     

    panevino

    Senior Member
    spanish and catalan - Spain
    One way to avoid "thin" is:

    The catenary arch has the ideal form to distribute the internal compressive forces created by the action of its self-weight. Thanks to this it can be built with a very small cross section.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    One way to avoid "thin" is:

    The catenary arch has the ideal form to distribute the internal compressive forces created by the action of its self-weight. Thanks to this it can be built with a very small cross section.
    That works for me in a way that "thin" does not.

    Or

    "Catenary arches can be built that look visually delicate, but due to the ..."
     

    panevino

    Senior Member
    spanish and catalan - Spain
    Thanks for your feedback. Also, now that we got here. May I ask if the word distribute is the appropriate one?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Thanks for your feedback. Also, now that we got here. May I ask if the word distribute is the appropriate one?
    I'm not a structural engineer, but it sounds fine to my ears.

    Professionals seem to use it:

    https://ascelibrary.org/doi/10.1061/(ASCE)SC.1943-5576.0000091

    Live-load distribution is an important step in the analysis of bridge superstructures. This paper introduces a new framework to compute live-load distribution for bridge girders.
     
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