The ch sound and the j sound.

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vintage_d3vil

Member
American English
I've recently learned that for the ch and j sound, our tongue must be touching the alveolar ridge. I never knew about it until it was mentioned to me. I was asked if its the same position as the t/d because most diagrams seem to depict it with the same position as t/d. Correct me if I'm wrong but, I feel like the ch and j sound is further back in position compared to the t/d position. For t and d, I would use the flat of my tongue tip. When I make the ch and j sound, it doesn't feel like I'm using my tongue tip, but rather my blade; it feels like my tongue tip is hanging off or down. In addition, the area of contact seems to be further back on the ridge while for the t/d, it's near the teeth. Do you guys agree or is it just me? :confused:
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    You're right: /t/ and /d/ are alveolar, and the ch /tʃ/ and j /dʒ/ sounds are called post-alveolar or palato-alveolar. You seem to be describing them accurately.
     

    vintage_d3vil

    Member
    American English
    You're right: /t/ and /d/ are alveolar, and the ch /tʃ/ and j /dʒ/ sounds are called post-alveolar or palato-alveolar. You seem to be describing them accurately.
    Thanks for your reply. I thought it was just me when I feel like the ch/j position is further back. Does Post-alveolar means it's touching the rear end of the alveolar ridge or does it mean it's touching that round, hard area in the back of your mouth(I think it's called the hard palate)?
     
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