the chair of

Yaroslava

Senior Member
Russian
I've got a question on some educational stuff. For instance this year I'm entering the university and I'm going to pick the chair of IT. Is it correct to say: "I'm unrolling the chair of IT" or "I'm entering the university for the chair of IT". As far as I know "the chair of" is one of the departments in university where you are studying set science.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    No, the chair is the post a professor holds. A suitable word is faculty: the history department is in the arts faculty; the IT department might be in the science faculty.

    And enrolling, not unrolling. The professor wouldn't like it if you unrolled his chair. :)
     

    Yaroslava

    Senior Member
    Russian
    So then I can say: "I'm entering the university in the IT department" I hesitate what preposition I should use then.
     

    thegreathoo

    Senior Member
    Srpski
    In US, this is called college or school at a university. For example, School (College) of Engineering at the University of Colorado.
    Faculty are professors at a college.
    Chair is the head of faculty.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    You're entering as a student, rather than as staff (faculty)? You shouldn't talk about chairs. For both you can talk about joining the department or the faculty/school/college.
     

    loghrat

    Senior Member
    British English / Danish
    So then I can say: "I'm entering the university in the IT department" I hesitate what preposition I should use then.
    Everyone will understand your sentence, Yaroslava. But this is what a native speaker would say in a normal conversation:
    "I'm going to university to study IT."
     
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