"The chairman conceded with X.X's position"

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  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    If I used "position", Teacup, then I'd use "conceded" transitively without any preposition:

    The chairman conceded Liam's position. This means that the chairman acknowledged that Liam's position was valid and then perhaps allowed Liam to continue arguing that position.
     
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    teacup2

    Senior Member
    Finnish
    So one could say "the chairman conceded Liam's position" or "the chairman conceded with/to Liam" (which preposition is better?)
     

    Welshie

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I do not think the use of the preposition of "with" is correct here. You can concede something, often a point, in an argument. The idea of "conceding a position" in itself seems strange to me.

    You can "concede to someone", as in a tennis match, if you give up.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Once again, Teacup, I wouldn't use a preposition with "conceded Liam's position". "Conceded" in this phrase works as a transitive verb and needs no preposition. Unlike Welshie, I have no problem with "conceding a position". That means that somebody concedes the position that another person takes in an argument or discussion.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Well, owlman, "The chairman conceded Liam's position" sounds odd to me too, so perhaps we are once again in the realm of AE-BE differences.
    That could be, Sound Shift. These differences do pop up from time to time, usually in areas where I'd never expect to see them. :)
     
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