the chance of 'there being'

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sudest

Senior Member
Turkish
What's the chance of there being an election this year? (Source: Michael Swan)

My problem here is the "there". If we omitted "there" then the sentence would be faulty? and How can I be aware of the necessity of using there -surely this kind of- in any sentence?
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    If you remove the 'there', but leave the 'being', then the sentence becomes faulty; but you can remove both, and the meaning of the sentence is preserved.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    You would not be surprised at , "What is the chance that there will be an election this year."

    If you use the phrase, "What are the chances of..." 'of' must be followed by a noun/noun phrase/gerund i.e. "of something" i.e. some event "being this year"
     

    grubble

    Senior Member
    British English
    The basic phrase is "there is"

    Examples

    There is a cow in the field.

    There used to be a statue in this square.

    What's the chance that there will be an election this year?

    What's the chance of there being an election this year?




    The final example is the gerund form of "there is"

    You cannot remove "there" from any of the above sentences.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Would you say "what are the chances of there being an election this year"?
    That's a different topic, sunyear, but it's a good question and other people have wondered about the use of chance vs chances.

    Here is one previous thread: And here are two more:

    You will find more if you sort through the list of titles you will find by searching for chances, though I admit that will take some patience. :)
     
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