The cloak looks well/good

JungKim

Senior Member
Korean
Context (I made this up):
There's this invisible cloak some scientists are testing.
The invisible cloak, when it's on, should make invisible the cloak itself and whatever it covers.
When not on, though, it just looks like an ordinary cloak.

Now, the scene is in the lab where a man is wearing the cloak for testing but it's not yet on.
Before starting the test, the observer jokes, (1) "It looks good on you."
And the tester replies, "Well, thank you."
Now the cloak is on but somehow the cloak still is visible, so the observer says, (2) "I still can see it."

In this context, can the observer say these alternatives?
(1) It looks well on you.
(2) It still looks well on you, or simply, It still looks well.
 
  • waltern

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Invisible/visible cloak context aside (I'm a little confused by it all, to be honest), "It (still) looks well (on you)" is simply incorrect.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    In this context, can the observer say these alternatives?
    (1) It looks well on you.
    (2) It still looks well on you, or simply, It still looks well.
    No: "well" doesn't work there. He'd have to say -

    (1a) It looks good on you.
    (2a) It still looks good on you, or simply, It still looks good.
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think It looks well on you is dated or regional. Some contributors seem to feel even more strongly about it, but if you google "it looks well on you" you will find lots of examples from novels.

    There is a previous thread:
    Fine Vs Well
     
    Last edited:

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Yes. Note that well is an adverb, and good is an adjective. Linking verbs, such as is, seems, tastes, appears, looks, etc. are followed by predicate adjectives, while other verbs (such as see) are modified by adverbs.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top