The company made three billion dollars [in the year through March.]

aleaf

Senior Member
Japanese
The company made three billion dollars in the year through March.

I made it up. Did the company made that amount in one year, or in the three months through March?
 
  • ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    It could mean "in the twelve months that ended in March", ie. April 1st YYYY and March 31st YYYY + 1 but, as heypresto said, it's your sentence.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    In the absence of any context, most people would take this phrase as referring to three months: January, February and March.

    However, if the context is a fiscal year that does not end in December, it could mean any other number of months. Context is always important.
     

    aleaf

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you very much, heypresto, Parla, ain't?, and Egmont!
    I meant in the twelve months that ended in March. The fictitious firm's fiscal year was from April to March.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    The company made three billion dollars in the year through March.

    I made it up. Did the company made that amount in one year, or in the three months through March?
    For both taxes and accounting, Corporations do not use the normal calendar year (Jan to Dec). Instead every corporation picks its own "fiscal year" when the corporation is created, choosing one of the 12 months as the "last month in our fiscal year". Once it is defined, it never changes for that corporation.

    The company in your quote made 3 billion dollars in their (12-month) fiscal year that ended in March.
     
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