The cost will come out of/on your salary/account?

Dazun

Senior Member
Hi all,

My sentences are,

1. The cost for misplaced goods will come out of/on your next months salary! (to me correct preposition to use here is "of") ?

2. Why hasn't this cost/charge come out of/on Richard? (not sure i think on is possible or is it from?)

(Richard, Shaw, Tom & I went to have a Pizza & agreed to split the bill between all 4, but (let's say tom was in-charge) Tom didn't take the money from Richard, so bill split between 3, then my question for Tom)​
3. Why hasn't this cost/charge come out of/on COCO Trading?
or maybe when a few companies agreed to share the cost but one company hadn't paid theirs so others all had to pay extra!
Please let me know if there are any other formal ways to ask this?

thanks in advance :D
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Did you take sentence 1 from somewhere and then make up the other two yourself?

    Only no. 1 seems to make any sense (and even that one is not entirely idiomatic). There, come out of = be taken from
     

    Dazun

    Senior Member
    I'll make it a bit less confusing! :rolleyes: hope this will work,

    Situation: a report shows how the electricity cost is being shared between a few companies that are renting the building but for some reason there was no share for COCO Trading!

    To the owner of the building:
    As you mentioned, if the total electricity cost is shared between all of us, why hasn't it come out of/on/from COCO Trading?

    Is it,

    A charge come out of something? (Salary, etc)

    A charge come out from/on someone (Richard,..)
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    What you mean is not in question. But the expression you’re trying to use would only be used in your example 1 – not in those other situations.

    Where is the money coming from? It’s coming out of … your salary / our savings / the trust fund / the public purse / their bank account, etc.

    In other words, the expression “comes out of” is used in relation to a source of funds, not a person or business. “Comes out on” is not used at all in this context.
     
    Last edited:

    dayixing

    New Member
    English
    You could say:

    As you mentioned, if the total electricity cost is meant to be shared between all of us, why hasn’t COCO Trading paid (their share)?
     

    dayixing

    New Member
    English
    1. The cost .... will come out of your next months salary.

    2. Why didn’t you take money from Richard (too)?
    Why aren’t you getting money from Richard (too)?
    Why aren’t you asking Richard for money (too)?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    #6
    What I would say is
    "Why hasn't Coco Trading been charged for their share of the electricity?"
    Or
    "Why hasn't Coco Trading/(whoever) paid their share of the bill/( whatever)?"

    Of course you need to change the pronouns to suitable ones.
     
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