"the cream and crown" (Traherne)

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  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    It is not an idiomatic expression. "Cream" and "crown" are each used on their own, and I think that "of all which round about did lie" applies only to "crown".
     

    ThomasK

    Senior Member
    Belgium, Dutch
    So it ought to be translated fairly literally, you mean? I thought the crown was a metaphor for the main things, the most valuable things, the final touch, is that correct? Now as for the cream: this is at least a metaphor again, I suppose, something like the most delicate substance/…, or …? tThanks in advance...
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    Both words are metaphors, but they don't belong together. Cream is both the best part of the milk, and the part that rises to the top. As a metaphor, it indicates the thing or part that is superior to the rest. although they share a similar nature.
    A crown represents the king, so "crown of all which round about did lie" suggests he rules over it, or it all belongs to his realm.
     
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