the day after Thanksgiving

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iniko

Member
Japanese
Hello!


I read this phrase in a recent Bloomberg News article.
"No longer will a trip on Greyhound cost the same on July 17 as the day after Thanksgiving,"


Why he says "July 17" while Thanksgiving Day is in November?
A metaphor or something?


Please explain the speaker's intent.
Thank you!
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Let's try it with missing (and unneeded) words replaced:

    "No longer will a trip on Greyhound cost the same on July 17 as (it costs on) the day after Thanksgiving,"
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    "July 17th" is chosen randomly.

    The day after Thanksgiving is a very important/choice travel day.

    I do not perceive a metaphor.
     

    iniko

    Member
    Japanese
    Thank you for your replies.
    I got it!

    Now I understand both the grammar and the cultural context of the sentence.
    Thank you so much!
     
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