The day vs. today

girloncrack

Senior Member
English/USA
Is there a way to say the equivalent of "the day", as in
"The day you learn to speak Hebrew will be the day I buy you a new car"
"That will be the day"
"We will be in Italy the day that you leave"
etc...
 
  • bat777

    Senior Member
    Israel, Hebrew
    "hayom" is simply ambiguous between 'today' and 'the day'. it's equally good in both meanings (though the the first one is more common).
    however, in some cases, like in the example that you gave "we will be in italy the day that you leave", you should say "bayom", meaning 'on the day' (or 'in' or 'at', i'm not sure about the correct preposition in english).

    gooday

    by the way, i would appreciate corrections of my english... :eek:
     

    Flaminius

    hedomodo
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    What if ha-yom is emphasized by ha-ze? I mean, if one says ha-yom ha-ze, does the phrase come to exclusively mean "today (= this, not any other, day)"?
     

    girloncrack

    Senior Member
    English/USA
    Aha, excellent alternative. Would saying this (ha'yom ha'zeh) sound stilted or formal in casual conversation?
     

    JAN SHAR

    Member
    pashto
    Also, you could use כיום, which also means "today". Although some people might take it to mean "like/according to/around today", because כ can mean "like/according to/around ("around" in the sense of "about")".
     

    Ali Smith

    Senior Member
    Urdu - Pakistan
    היום and כיום are both possible in classical Hebrew but only the former is used in modern Hebrew.
     

    Abaye

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Today has two meanings: "on or for this day", "at the present time". The usual in modern Hebrew is כיום for the latter, היום for the former, but in certain situations היום is also for the latter, e.g. "הנוער של היום".
     
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