the dead go fast!

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valy822

Senior Member
Italy- Italian
Good evening
I would like to know the meaning of this English saying please.
The context is: a man cries for the death of his wife but a quarter later he does not cry any more. Then another person, who is looking at the man, says: "The dead go fast!"

Can you help me please?

Thanks
 
  • lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    Sounds like the punchline of a joke that may be a play on either the words or on something that happened in a sentence before the ones you've supplied.

    Also "a quarter later" is missing something (a quarter hour?), so you might want to check the rest in case anything else is left out.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Hello Valy,

    We ask for context and background for a reason. Without them, we can waste lots of time guessing.

    A quarter, to a typical AE speaker, may very well mean a period of play in a football game. It may also be, as LSP suggests, a quarter hour.

    Please help us to help you.

    regards,
    Cuchuflete
     

    charmingman

    Member
    English
    valy822 said:
    Good evening
    I would like to know the meaning of this English saying please.
    The context is: a man cries for the death of his wife but a quarter later he does not cry any more. Then another person, who is looking at the man, says: "The dead go fast!"
    The gist of it seems to be that the speaker is expressing his surprise and disapproval of the husband's lack of grief for his dead wife.

    CM
     

    valy822

    Senior Member
    Italy- Italian
    yes you are right... it is a quarter hour later...it seems that the person says:"oh you were crying a minute ago, and now you are happy!How can it be possible!" and so he says: "the dead go fast" which can mean "you have forgotten your wife (the dead) in a moment",; "go fast" as "disappear in a moment" (you forget them in a moment). Am I right?Can this explanation be right?
    Hope this helps and that you understand what I am saying

    Valy
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    valy822 said:
    yes you are right... it is a quarter hour later...it seems that the person says:"oh you were crying a minute ago, and now you are happy!How can it be possible!" and so he says: "the dead go fast" which can mean "you have forgotten your wife (the dead) in a moment",; "go fast" as "disappear in a moment" (you forget them in a moment). Am I right?Can this explanation be right?
    Hope this helps and that you understand what I am saying

    Valy
    Yes, that's how I would understand it, too.
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    valy822 said:
    yes you are right... it is a quarter hour later...it seems that the person says:"oh you were crying a minute ago, and now you are happy!How can it be possible!" and so he says: "the dead go fast" which can mean "you have forgotten your wife (the dead) in a moment",; "go fast" as "disappear in a moment" (you forget them in a moment). Am I right?Can this explanation be right?
    Hope this helps and that you understand what I am saying

    Valy
    Hey valy822;
    Yes..'the dead go fast'..is another way of saying..'Wow..you have forgotten about your wife already..that was quick!'...
    It is like the other saying we have here..'Out of sight..out of mind'...meaning what you do not see..you forget about..

    te gato;)
     

    leenico

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. english
    The context is: a man cries for because of the death of his wife but a quarter later he does not cry any more. Then another person, who is looking at the man, says: "The dead go fast!"
    The way I read it he was crying for his wife to die. I changed it to imply that he was crying because she died. :D
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    "The dead go fast" could also be a literary allusion to
    "Denn die Todten reiten Schnell."
    ("For the dead travel fast.")
    lines taken from
    Bram Stoker's novel Dracula, in which the author is himself quoting Lenore, a famous poem by the German poet
    Gottfried BÜRGER.
    There are numerous translations. Here's another :
    "Look forth! look forth! the moon shines bright:
    We and the dead gallop fast thro' the night.
    Source:
    http://www.artofeurope.com/burger/burg1.htm
     
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