the deep sickness of the soul

Tea Addict

Senior Member
Republic of Korea Korean
Hello everyone. I would like to know what "the deep sickness of the soul" means in the following sentences (I hid the names in the spoiler alert for future readers) :

I’ve barely been bothered by the movement of the boat this time. A little nausea is nothing compared to the deep sickness of the soul I felt when I made my discovery last night, that it was
Will
who as good as killed
my sister
.

- Lucy Foley, The Guest List, Epilogue

This is a thriller novel published in 2020 in the United Kingdom. One hundred and fifty guests gathered at some remote and deserted fictional islet called Inis an Amplóra off the coast of the island of Ireland to celebrate the wedding between Jules (a self-made woman running an online magazine called The Download) and Will (a celebrity appearing in a TV show program called Survive the Night). The narrator Hannah is thinking how she felt "the deep sickness of the soul" last night.

In this part, I am wondering what "the deep sickness of the soul" might mean.
Would that mean that her soul felt like vomiting, like being sick, perhaps...?
Or is it perhaps related to "soul-sick," meaning a spiritual dejection, perhaps...?

I would very much appreciate your help. :)
 
  • Tea Addict

    Senior Member
    Republic of Korea Korean
    Dear boozer,

    Thank you very much for the explanation.
    Then "the deep sickness of the soul" would have nothing to do with seasickness or nausea or whatever that is sick at the stomach and makes you want to vomit; it would be a metaphorical expression to mean that the narrator was very disappointed, dejected, devastated, hurt at the heart, and disillusioned.
    I sincerely appreciate your help. :)
     

    Tea Addict

    Senior Member
    Republic of Korea Korean
    Dear kentix,

    Thank you very much for the comment.
    Actually, the narrator here is Hannah. Though Jules would have been very soul-sick too, I guess... o_O
     
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