[the dog] hopping round hoping for a tail end

susanna76

Senior Member
Romanian
Hi,

Does "tail end" in the following passage mean bit of food thrown to the dog? And if so, is it supposed to mean that? Because Merriam-Webster gives the following:
tail end

1: buttocks, rump
2: the hindmost end
3: the concluding period <the tail end of the session>

"He would cook while the girls frolicked in the waves, and then they would devour hot dogs smothered in tomato sauce, Dido hopping round them hoping for a tail end."

Thank you!
 
  • susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Right. So it's actually a set term to be used in connection with hot dogs, or is it used only humoristically?
     

    Ironicus

    Senior Member
    English & Swahili - East Africa
    No, it's not just to be used in connection with hot dogs, and in fact I've never heard it applied to a hot dog, perhaps because hot dogs are all tail end and nothing else.
     

    pwmeek

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Tail end is a set phrase meaning the last bit of a long original piece. It can reasonably be used regarding a scrap or ort from a hot dog, as they are long and narrow.

    I wouldn't use "tail end" to describe a scrap from the corner of a sheet of paper, but I would use it to describe the last few inches or even the last few feet from a roll of adding machine tape.
     
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