the dubious scholarship and outright lies .... were thing of the past

kazuhiko fudaba

Senior Member
Japanese
In the article of the Washington Post : Teaching America's truth , there is a sentence as follows.

It would be some solace to know that the dubious scholarship and outright lies that informed instruction
about slavery for millions of students throughout the 20th century were thing of the past.


I try to break down the underlined clause grammatically as below.

The subject of the underlined clause: the dubious scholarship and outright lies
the adjective clause to modify the subject: that informed instruction about slavery for millions of students throughout the 20th century,
the verb: were
the complement: thing of the past

Would you please check my breaking-down?

Thank you.
Kazu Fudaba
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Considering the plural verb, I suspect the writer meant "things of the past".

    "Dubious scholarship and outright lies" could well be considered as a singular subject, as Mr TT's post suggests.
     
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