...the early morning kind, <where> they wake up and cannot get back to sleep

TheClusteringstars

New Member
Chinese
A paragraph from gb.cri.cn:
They report insomnia around 50 percent more frequently than their male counterparts, especially the early morning kind, where they wake up and cannot get back to sleep.
does 'Where ' here lead to a Non-restrictive Relative Clause ? I'm getting confused .the early Morning kind is not a location .
 
  • Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Here, "where" means "in which", but the latter sounds a little too formal. We often use "where" where :) it doesn't strictly refer to location, but more to a situation, example, or case.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Where is often used to introduce relative clauses which* really require a different pronoun, especially when: it saves them a bit of effort.
    e.g.
    I'm reading an article where it says I shouldn't eat too much lard. => in which
    It was one of those times where your parents make you look stupid. => when

    *This sentence is an example: lazy folk might have used where instead of in which.
    EDIT: Sorry, Edinburgher, I do think it's a kind of laziness at work ~ "Why can't we have one pronoun that fits all situations?" or "I'm just going to grab the first pronoun that I see on the shelf."
     
    Last edited:

    TheClusteringstars

    New Member
    Chinese
    Where is often used to introduce relative clauses which* really require a different pronoun, especially when: it saves them a bit of effort.
    e.g.
    I'm reading an article where it says I shouldn't eat too much lard. => in which
    It was one of those times where your parents make you look stupid. => when

    *This sentence is an example: lazy folk might have used where instead of in which.
    EDIT: Sorry, Edinburgher, I do think it's a kind of laziness at work ~ "Why can't we have one pronoun that fits all situations?" or "I'm just going to grab the first pronoun that I see on the shelf."
    Is <where> more Obscure than<in Which >?
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    How do you mean 'more obscure'? It's more formal, more correct ~ in speech it might sound a tad pedantic even.
     
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