the elephant ....... its trunk around him

hyperslow

Senior Member
Polish
Hello there,

I wonder what would be the best way to say that the elephant ..... its trunk around James. I would go for to wrap but I'm afraid it's too good to be true, isn't it. What about to coil: The elephant coiled its trunk at the height of James' chest and squeezed him a bit.

Which one would You go for?

hyp
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    To coil suggests a more aggressive spiralling movement than to wrap, which is cosy by comparison.

    If the elephant was being nasty, I'd say coil; if it was being nice, I'd say wrap.
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    What about: The elephant touched James' chest with its trunk and slightly pinched him. The elephant touched James on his chest with its trunk, slightly pinching him. The elephant placed his (its) trunk around James' chest and slightly pinched him. I think The elephant wrapped his trunk around James'' chest would sound good, too.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I don't think elephants "pinch" - it seems too dainty for an elephant. "Pinch" is usually "gripping between finger and thumb>"

    You could say, "The elephant's trunk held James gently around his chest and squeezed him a bit."

    or

    "The elephant's trunk circled/encompassed James gently around his chest and squeezed him a bit."

    Oh, and in your original, (i) wrap is what elephant's trunks do - this would be the most popular verb, (ii), The elephant coiled its trunk at the height of James' chest means that the elephant's trunk was not near James when it coiled, but it was at the height of James's chest.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I would go for to wrap but I'm afraid it's too good to be true, isn't it.
    Nothing wrong with 'wrap'.
    I'd say 'wrapped its trunk around James' chest': that is, if you mean 'encircled James' chest with its trunk'.
     

    hyperslow

    Senior Member
    Polish
    @ PaulQ:
    Oh, and in your original, (i) wrap is what elephant's trunks do - this would be the most popular verb, (ii), The elephant coiled its trunk at the height of James' chest means that the elephant's trunk was not near James when it coiled, but it was at the height of James's chest.

    That's interesting, but I'm too shallow a blocke to understand that. Please, can you expand on that.
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Please, can you expand on that.
    At the height of does not imply physical contact. It simply introduces a basis of comparison: The elephant coiled its trunk. - At what height? - At the height of James' chest.
     
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