The esquire of Isildur

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  • DEHER

    Senior Member
    (cap.) an unofficial title of respect, having no precise significance, sometimes placed, esp. in its abbreviated form, after a man's surname in formal written address: in the U.S., usually applied to lawyers, women as well as men;
    in Britain, applied to a commoner considered to have gained the social position of a gentleman. Abbr.: Esq.
    World History squire (def. 2).
    World History a man belonging to the order of English gentry ranking next below a knight.
    World History[Archaic.] squire (def. 1).

    esquire - WordReference.com Dictionary of English
     

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    Is Isildor a place, then?

    If so, it means the 'gentleman landowner' of Isildur. Esquires are not titled aristocracy, they have earned their title by becoming large landowners.
     

    Chez

    Senior Member
    English English
    Uhu! Maybe some more context wold help because in that case 'esquire' could be the longer (original) version of 'squire', which is a young lad aspiring to become a knight who works as an assistant to the knight (cleaning his armour, helping him put it on, looking after his horse etc).

    If you could give us more of an idea of how this sentence relates to the paragraph/story as a whole it could save time.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    From OED:
    Chivalry. A young man of gentle birth, who as an aspirant to knighthood, attended upon a knight, carried his shield, and rendered him other services.​
    This use does not often arise in ordinary conversation these days in English-speaking countries. If Isildur is a knight, then his esquire is essentially his apprentice.
     
    Last edited:

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Taking a wild guess, I suspect this is from one of Tolkien's works
    Ohtar was Isildur's young esquire. In the autumn of Third Age 2 he was the one who was commanded to at all costs bring the shards of the Narsil out of the tragic Battle of the Gladden Fields and into safety. Together with an unnamed, young companion he managed to reach Imladris (Rivendell) with the shards.

    Ohtar, his companion, and Estelmo (Elendur's esquire) were the only three to survive the battle.

    It may be noted that Ohtar was probably not his name but a title meaning "warrior, soldier". This title was, according to Tolkien himself:

    "the title of all who, though fully trained and experienced, had not yet been admitted to the rank of 'roquen', 'knight'." — Unfinished Tales, by Tolkien
    Source
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Hi guys. What does esquire mean?
    here is the phrase that I have taken it from:
    The esquire of Isildur
    What is the source of this phrase, and what is the complete sentence? (Forum rules require this information be provided.)

    I suspect it's from Tolkien....


    ETA: Cross-posted.
     

    Suleyman92

    Member
    Kurdish
    Uhu! Maybe some more context wold help because in that case 'esquire' could be the longer (original) version of 'squire', which is a young lad aspiring to become a knight who works as an assistant to the knight (cleaning his armour, helping him put it on, looking after his horse etc).

    If you could give us more of an idea of how this sentence relates to the paragraph/story as a whole it could save time.
    For sure!here is the text:
    From the ruins of the Gladden Fields, where Isildur perished, three men only came over back the mountains after long wandering.
    One of them was Ohtar, the esquire of Isildur,who bore the shards of the sword of Elindel;and he brought them to Valandil,the heir of Isildur,who being but a child had remained here in Rivendell.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Isildur was one of the great warriors and leaders of men of Middle Earth. He lived long before the events of The Lord of the Rings.
     
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