the evil is afraid of the clarity

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LucasMeeh

New Member
Portuguese
Hello!
I really need help from you to see if this phrase is correct:

"Do not fear the dark because, in fact, the evil is afraid of the clarity. Light up the darkness".

English is not the main language of my country and the phrase need to be 100% correct because it will be written on a place that could not receive correction.
I'd like to know if the construction is correct and if it is coherent, I mean, if you can understand what it is trying to say.
Thanks to all!
 
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  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello LucasMeeh, and Welcome to the Forum! :)

    It would be helpful if you were to tell us in other words what it is that you're trying to say, and why you're trying to say it.

    It would also be useful if you were to specify the part of the sentence of which you are least certain; that way, we can choose a better thread title than the one we have at present. :)
     

    LucasMeeh

    New Member
    Portuguese
    Well, what I am trying to tell to people who read those words is that he/she should not be afraid of darkness. The evil is afraid of the light, so we must not fear something that, in fact, is afraid of us. (I'm assuming that the one who reads this isn't a bad person). It's a phrase that I'm going to use as a tattoo, because I want to pass this message to the world. I think that the phrase is correct, but as I am not an expert, I would like you to tell me if it is something wrong or unclear. Thanks! Sorry about my English
     
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    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Welcome to the English forum, LucasMeeh!

    I suggest you look up clarity in the forum dictionary. In your sentence it does not express the opposite of darkness. In fact, it is often used for clarity of though or speech.
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    I see. So it's for a tattoo, is it? Hmm, I can see why you'd want to get it right.

    In which case, I would focus my attention on this part: the evil is afraid of the clarity.

    There are several considerations here. I'm not so sure about the double use of 'the' here. I'd say that you could lose both of those, but certainly the second: (the) evil is afraid of clarity.

    Also, I'm curious to learn what you understand by clarity. In English, 'clarity' is not the opposite of 'the dark', ie. it is not synonymous with 'light'. (Cross-posted)


    nb. normally, this thread would be beyond the scope of the forum, but seeing as you're new, and that this is of such vital importance to you, I'll let it run provided that you promise to capitalise the pronoun 'I'.
     

    LucasMeeh

    New Member
    Portuguese
    Clarity and light are almost the same in portuguese (my native language).

    So, you think I should exchange "clarity" for "light"? Or lightness. "The evil is afraid of light" Another question: Could I say : "Do not fear the dark because, in fact, the evil THAT is afraid of light"? Does it sound weird?
     
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    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    It seems to me that you are assuming that 'the dark' and 'the evil' are two words for the same thing:

    "Do not fear the dark/evil because, in fact, the dark/evil is afraid of [the clarity/light].


    However, that is not true in English. If that is what you mean, you will have to make the equivalency clear.
     

    LucasMeeh

    New Member
    Portuguese
    I'm supposing that the evil comes from the dark. In my language "dark" and "evil" aren't the same thing, but you can relate them (I'm supposing that the evil is "inside" of the dark, they are something that walk together). I don't know how to explain this better in English. I am looking for a phrase without words repetition. In Portuguese, a short phrase like that with the same two words, like this:

    Do not fear the evil because, in fact, the evil is afraid of light.
    Do not fear the dark because, in fact, the dark is afraid of light.

    Isn't a good phrase, it lacks variety and it's "ugly". Is it the same as in English?

    I am thinking about:

    Do not fear the dark because, in fact, the evil is afraid of light. Light up the darkness.

    I didn't want to use "light" two times. That's why I chose clarity. Any suggestions of another word with the same meaning of "light" that should fit the message?
     
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    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I think such a saying needs brevity. You could say, for example:

    'Do not fear the dark. Evil fears the light. Let your light shine.'

    However, this still seems to me too wordy for an aphorism. I would cut out either the first or the second sentence.
     

    LucasMeeh

    New Member
    Portuguese
    Thanks to all for the help!! I'm going with: "Do not fear the dark. Let your light shine." . I think it pass everything that I want to say.

    Thanks a lot!!
     
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