the exams are all over/ended

EdisonBhola

Senior Member
Korean
Hi all,

Is it idiomatic/correct to say "when the exams are all ended" when the meaning is that they are all over? As in:

I'll be so happy when the exams are all ended!

Many thanks!
 
  • Laurentiana

    Member
    English - Canada
    Hi all,

    Is it idiomatic/correct to say "when the exams are all ended" when the meaning is that they are all over? As in:

    I'll be so happy when the exams are all ended!

    Many thanks!
    It’s neither correct nor idiomatic.

    Just say “when the exams are over” or “when the exams have ended.”

    Both are idiomatic in a sense, because “exams” is standing in for “exam period.” In the first, “are over” is a predicative completion describing the state of the period. In the second, “have ended” is a compound verb referring to an action - the running of time during the period. That’s why the auxiliary verb is “to have” rather than “to be.”

    You can also omit the definite article: “ ... when exams are over/have ended.”

    If you need to distinguish between all and some, say “... when all the exams are over/have ended,” with stress on “all” in spoken language.

    paul
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thanks for all the explanations.

    Does "finished" work?

    e.g. I'll be so happy when the exams are finished.

    Many thanks.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    You might say this for emphasis. It's colloquial:

    I'll be so happy when the exams are all over and done with.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    But yes, in BE “are finished” works infinitely better than “are ended”.

    I’ll be so happy when the exams are ended :thumbsdown::thumbsdown::thumbsdown:
    I’ll be so happy when the exams are finished :thumbsup:
    I’ll be so happy when the exams are over :thumbsup::thumbsup:
     
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