The expenses of which are paid by the groom

alex_ln

Senior Member
Polish
Hello

Is the structure of "of which" appropriate in the following context?
"There is a formal wedding party, the expenses of which are paid by the groom."
Thanks
 
  • alex_ln

    Senior Member
    Polish
    "Is that what you mean?" No!, So I will change it to "There is a formal wedding ceremony, the expenses of which are paid by the groom."
    PS: This sentence is about the general overview of wedding ceremony. Hence, do I need to add article "the" before groom in the mentioned sentence as well?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    As which refers to "formal wedding ceremony", the expenses of which is fine, and yes, the is required before groom.
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    I guess weddings work differently in different cultures. Here's how a recent, unusually big, US wedding I attended worked:

    Friday night, the rehearsal dinner (after the rehearsal for the wedding), paid for by the groom's parents
    Saturday morning, informal breakfast also paid for by the groom's parents
    Saturday afternoon, the church ceremony, paid for by the bride's parents
    Saturday evening, the wedding reception paid for by he bride's parents
    Sunday morning, farewell brunch paid for by the bride's parents

    There were about 100 people at all these events.
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I've been the groom at two weddings, father of the groom at two more, and involved closely enough with others to know how the expenses were divided. The only constant I can think of is that the groom's parents, if they were alive and had the necessary financial resources, always paid for the rehearsal dinner - if there was a rehearsal. Everything else can vary. This is especially true when a couple marries later in life and is financially independent of their parents, even if those parents are still around. And let's not get into the issues that arise when there are two grooms or two brides!

    Back to the topic: "groom" is countable. (Example: the last sentence of the previous paragraph.) Therefore, it requires an article. Since you mean the specific groom at this specific wedding, the definite article "the" is correct.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hi Alex I'm just checking that by "formal wedding ceremony" you really do mean the part of the wedding during which the couple become legally married, the actual marriage, whether civil or religious.
    It's off -topic I know, so I won't say any more here.

    :)
    Hermione
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    Hi Alex I'm just checking that by "formal wedding ceremony" you really do mean the part of the wedding during which the couple become legally married, the actual marriage, whether civil or religious.
    Hermione
    Well, that's why I posted a detailed description of a US wedding, so that he could see the technical terms for each phase for himself.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Yes you made your contribution which I am sure alex will find extremely useful, and now I am making mine. After all, first we had "the formal wedding party" which I understood to mean the reception and now we have the 'formal wedding ceremony' and "This sentence is about the general overview of [a/the] wedding ceremony. " It's still not very clear to me: I know what an informal wedding is but I don't know what an informal marriage/'wedding ceremony' might be. But anyway, the language question has been thoroughly answered and if Alex wants to investigate why I as the reader am so puzzled he'll have to start another thread about vocabulary.

    Hermione
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    Am I the only person who intuitively prefers "the expenses for the wedding party" over "the expenses of the wedding party"? It really sounds like it should be for which to me. (On the other hand, I would only agree with "the expense of​ the wedding party.")

    I would of course revise the original sentence to remove the passive-voice construction and the trouble over the pronoun by just saying "... wedding party, for which the groom pays."
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I did think about 'to pay for' and 'to pay' but it seemed as if this would come out as "the expenses of which are paid for by the groom." which would add little. or "the expenses for which the groom pays."

    Pay for, heat up, etc seem to have pronouns that serve little purpose.
     
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