the first reporter <to be> permitted to film

peytons

Member
Chinese Anhui Dialect
This is a filling blank in China college entrance exam.

"So it was a great honour to be invited backstage at the not-for-profit Panda Base, where ticket money helps pay for research, I was allowed to get up close to these cute animals at the 600-acre centre. From tomorrow, I will be their UK ambassador. The title will be officially given to me at a ceremony in London. But my connection with pandas goes back to my days on a TV show in the mid-1980s, when I was the first Western TV reporter__66___ (permit) to film a special unit caring for pandas rescued from starvation in the wild. My ambassadorial duties will include introducing British visitors to the 120-plus pandas at Chengdu and others at a research in the misty mountains of Bifengxia."

There are two choices "permitted" and "to be permitted" , which confused me a lot and seemed right both.
So which is the right/better one? Can native speakers help judge it?
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, "to be permitted to" is all right, although "permitted" alone (or "allowed," that were a possible choice) is preferable.

    There are two other mistakes in this passage. There should be a full stop after "pay for their research." And near the end, we don't say "at a research" – it would more likely be a "research centre" or "research facility."
     

    grammar-in-use

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Yes, "to be permitted to" is all right, although "permitted" alone (or "allowed," that were a possible choice) is preferable.

    There are two other mistakes in this passage. There should be a full stop after "pay for their research." And near the end, we don't say "at a research" – it would more likely be a "research centre" or "research facility."
    Sorry to revive the post, but could you please let me know how you would interpret the "unit" as used in the following sentence?

    But my involvement goes back to my days on the TV show Newsround in the mid-1980s, when I was the first Western TV reporter permitted to film a special unit caring for pandas rescued from starvation in the wild.

    What does the "unit" mean here?

    I'd really appreciate your help.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    It sounds like a special unit of a larger organization (maybe a zoo? maybe a government department?) that has the task of caring for those pandas.
     

    grammar-in-use

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It sounds like a special unit of a larger organization (maybe a zoo? maybe a government department?) that has the task of caring for those pandas.
    Thank you very much for your quick reply.

    Here are two meanings for "unit" from the Oxford dictionary:
    1. a group of people who work or live together, especially for a particular purpose, as in "Medical units were operating in the disaster area".

    2. a department, especially in a hospital, that provides a particular type of care or treatment, as in the intensive care unit.

    Which one would you vote for? (I'd go for "2".)

    By the way, here's the context: China holidays: The wok stars and pandas of Chengdu | Daily Mail Online
     

    AnythingGoes

    Senior Member
    English - USA (Midwest/Appalachia)
    Without knowing more about the situation, either 1 or 2 is possible. If the unit includes infrastructure like buildings, number 2 fits best. If not, number 1 is better.
     
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