the football has lost much of its action

redgiant

Senior Member
Cantonese, Hong Kong
A (soccer) football loses pressure over time regardless of how well it's cared for. It becomes heavy and cannot bounce well when kicked. A football with greater air pressure can easily go much farther through the air than one with less air pressure.
I'm just wondering if native speakers would say something like "the football has lost much of its action". Imagine you start playing football with your friends in the park. You feel that the ball is bulky and doesn't bounce well. Would you say "The football seems to have lost much of its action"?
 
  • redgiant

    Senior Member
    Cantonese, Hong Kong
    Thank you very much. Are your suggestions applicable to other deflated balls (e.g tennis balls, baseballs)
    The tennis ball is deflating/The tennise ball lost its bounce/the tennis ball is not bouncing.
     

    Miss Julie

    Senior Member
    English-U.S.
    Thank you very much. Are your suggestions applicable to other balls (e.g tennis balls, baseballs)
    The tennis ball is deflating/The tennise ball lost its bounce/the tennis ball is not bouncing.
    Only to balls that are inflated (e.g., volleyballs); tennis balls and baseballs are not inflated and thus do not deflate.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    When I played, we said that old tennis balls (and wet tennis balls) that had lost their bounce were dead. (These tennis balls are dead. Open a new can.) Also, cracked ping-pong balls, golf balls, etc.
    Baseballs aren't supposed to bounce. ;)
     

    ewhite

    Senior Member
    USA/English
    Back in the Stone Age, I played schoolyard games that involved a pink rubber ball. Once it lost its bounce, we said it was dead.

    The pink rubber ball of choice as a Hi-Bounce Spalding, which we pronounced as Spauldeen.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    I've never encountered a tennis ball or baseball that lost its bounce. If such balls do lose their bounce, it must be after a LONG period of time. :eek:
    I don't know, I just assumed they could go "off" quite quickly. Isn't that why they change the balls during the course of games in professional matches? I would not think that losing its bounce meant it was completely bounce-free, just an under performance.
     

    GMF1991

    Senior Member
    English (UK, Suffolk)
    Only to balls that are inflated (e.g., volleyballs); tennis balls and baseballs are not inflated and thus do not deflate.
    Tennis balls may not be inflated, but they are pressurised and therefore can lose their pressure and thus bounce less. I had this happen to me quite a lot when I played tennis.

    :)
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I (BrE speaker) have never heard anyone say, "The football has lost much of its action", and I could not say it myself. I could say:
    The ball's gone down; or
    The ball's (gone) a bit flat; or
    The ball needs some air; or
    The ball needs pumping up.
     
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