The forfeit?

sambistapt

Senior Member
Brazilian Portuguese
Hello amigos!

" Carlos Tevez once was late and the forfeit was to wear a Brazilian national team jersey or pay a large amount of money and he preferred to pay it."

In the case, Was the forfeit a kind of fine?

Thanks,

Sam:cool:
 
  • pauloliebre

    Senior Member
    British English
    In this case, it refers to a humorous "game" in which a player has to give up an object or perform a specified action if he commits a fault. In the case of Tevez (an Argentinian footballer) the "forfeit" was to wear the shirt of his Brazillian opponents as a mild sort of punishment.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    It's quite familiar to me, at least in the context of bets (rather than contracts).
    Could you please expand on that comment? Precisely in which contexts have you or do you encounter this word utilized in this manner? I ask because, though I am familiar with this use as well, I don't recall hearing or reading it with any frequency in contemporary AE contexts.
     

    Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    Could you please expand on that comment? Precisely in which contexts have you or do you encounter this word utilized in this manner? I ask because, though I am familiar with this use as well, I don't recall hearing or reading it with any frequency in contemporary AE contexts.
    The forfeit is the penalty for losing a bet (or losing a drinking game or something similar). I suppose "What's the forfeit?" is a bit more formal than saying "What happens if I lose?", but it doesn't sound that unusual to me. If you do a search of Urban Dictionary, a bunch of related uses come up, some full of AE obscenities, so I assume they were added by other AE speakers.

    Some of the entries under "drinking forfeit" seem relevant: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=drinking+forfeit

    I don't know much about Jodi Picoult, but here's an example usage I find unremarkable from a 2001 novel that, I think, has a contemporary setting: "by now, everyone knew that the forfeit of the bet was Jack's free will."
    http://books.google.com/books?id=BquVRIOPyOUC&pg=PA47&lpg=PA47&dq=salem+falls+jodi+"forfeit"&source=bl&ots=1zCASX5-x9&sig=RrfGKsvk9eKB81UfooW5WOWN270&hl=en&ei=ODVNSpS-BJaxtweewtjVDg&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    Thanks, Franzi. I wonder if Ms. Picoult would put "forfeit" in this manner in the dialog of one of her characters rather than in that of a third-person narrator.

    Is "drinking forfeit" the context in which you've personally encountered the word?
     

    Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    Is "drinking forfeit" the context in which you've personally encountered the word?
    I think I've generally encountered it in contexts like: "So I had this bet on with Peter, and the forfeit was for me to streak across campus, but I forgot it was parents' weekend, and... [long embarrassing story]".
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I think I've generally encountered it in contexts like: "So I had this bet on with Peter, and the forfeit was for me to streak across campus, but I forgot it was parents' weekend, and... [long embarrassing story]".
    Thanks, Franzi.

    Somehow, this usage strikes me as having a more formal register; I'd not be surprised to hear it from a college graduate, perhaps, but it's not something I believe I'd be likely to hear on the street or in most bars. I know that I'd personally be unlikely to write it into the dialog of an average AE speaker.
     

    tabyyy

    Senior Member
    English, Spanish
    I understood what the sentence meant, but I have to agree it's not very common to use "forfeit" in this context in AE, or at least not to my knowledge.
     

    MichaelW

    Senior Member
    English (British)
    It originates in a legal term (from the Online Etymological Dictionary)

    forfeit (n.) c.1300, from O.Fr. forfait "crime," originally pp. of forfaire "transgress," from for- "outside, beyond," + faire "to do" (from L. facere; see factitious). Translating M.L. foris factum. Sense shifted c.1450 from the crime to the penalty.

    In UK English this word was more common in previous centuries than it is now, but I agree that in sports and in betting or drinking games it it still used quite a lot.

    Google for "forfeit" + "Madoff" (464,000 hits) and one can see that in US law the term certainly exists.

    Here is a link
    to game forfeits and Andy Murray from 2008, the term is still extant.

    I have the sense that a "penalty" is a punishment for breaking the law, a "forfeit" is what you lose for breaking some boundary, including breaking the law, but also used in fun.
     
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