The Great Wall, Yangtze River

gao_yixing

Senior Member
Chinese
In Chinese, they are called 长城(chang cheng) and 长江(chang jiang), which mean long city(wall) and long river. What are their names in other languages?
 
  • Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Japanese:
    Great Wall - 万里の長城 (banri-no chōjō)
    長城 alone can be hardly understood without context.
    Yangtze River - 長江 (chōkō)
    揚子江 (yōsukō) has been used for a long time but is being replaced by the more accurate 長江.
     

    Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Hi,
    [edit: Dutch]
    长城 : de Chinese Muur, de Grote Muur (but the latter one only when the context is clear)
    [lit. the Chinese wall, the Great Wall)
    长江 : Jangtsekiang or Blauwe Rivier [the Blue River]

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     

    gao_yixing

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    长城 : de Chinese Muur, de Grote Muur (but the latter one only when the context is clear)
    [lit. the Chinese wall, the Great Wall)
    长江 : Jangtsekiang or Blauwe Rivier [the Blue River]
    Hi. Thank you.
    But what language is this? Is it Flemish or French?
    It's interesting that Yangtze River is called Blue River. It is not so clear indeed. :p
     

    Frank06

    Senior Member
    Nederlands / Dutch (Belgium)
    Oops, I forgot to indicate it's Dutch. The terms I mentioned are used in Flanders and the Netherlands. No idea where the 'blue' comes from :). BTW, 'blue water' in Dutch means (or has the connotation of) crystal clear water...

    But since you mentioned French:
    长城 : la Grande Muraille (also the name of a Chinese bookstore in Brussels :)
    长江 : Yangzi Jiang, Chang Jiang, or fleuve Bleu

    Groetjes,

    Frank
     

    ayed

    Senior Member
    Arabic(Saudi)
    In Arabic:
    The Great Wall : سور الصين العظيم
    Transliteration :Soor as-Seen al-'Adheem

    Yangtze River : نهر ينقتز
    Transliteration :Nahr Yungtiz
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Portuguese:

    The Great Wall (of China): a Grande Muralha (da China)
    the river Yangtze: o rio Yangtze (I have never heard another name for it)
     

    Tolovaj_Mataj

    Senior Member
    Slovene, Slovenia
    Slovene:

    The Great Wall: Véliki kitajski zid
    Yangtze River: Modra reka

    If I remember correctly from the elementary school, we were taught like this:
    Jangce kiang = Modra reka (The Blue river)
    Hoang Ho = Rumena reka (The Yellow river)
    I always thought these are correct translations.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    In Arabic:
    The Great Wall : سور الصين العظيم
    Transliteration :Soor as-Seen al-'Adheem

    Yangtze River : نهر ينقتز
    Transliteration :Nahr Yungtiz
    I agree with the first, which by the way means : the great fence of China.

    As for the second one, I never read the transliteration like this. In Egypt, at least, we say يانجتسي Yangetsi (the extra (e) is due to the impossibility -for the Arab tongue- to pronounce three/four consecutive consonants).
     

    mcibor

    Senior Member
    Polish:

    Wielki Mur Chiński - Great Wall of China
    Jangcy - Yangtze River

    In Polish we don't add word "river" to rivers. Moreover you can say, and be understood:
    Wielki Mur
    Mur Chiński
    for the Great Wall

    Regards
    Michał
     

    sunchaser

    New Member
    romanian, Romania
    in romaneste
    the great wall = marele zid chinezesc (the great chinesse wall)
    yangtze river = fluviul albastru (the blue river)
    (Hung he = fluviul galben)
     
    In Thai language we call..
    กำแพงเมืองจีน (Kamphaeng Muang Jeen) -- Chinese Wall
    แม่น้ำแยงซี (Menam Yang Zee) -- Yangtze River ;)
     

    Tolovaj_Mataj

    Senior Member
    Slovene, Slovenia
    This is so hilarious:

    Polish: Wielki Mur Chiński (Great Wall of China)
    Rumanian: marele zid chinezesc (the great chinesse wall)

    (Slavic) Poles use a word from Romance languages and (Romanic) Rumanians use a word of Slavic origine. Yes, yes, the "naighbour's" words sound much much beter than our own. :D
     

    Lugubert

    Senior Member
    Lovely thread!

    In Swedish, the Wall is Kinesiska muren (The Chinese wall).

    My 1937 dictionary explains, Yang-tsï-kiang, Jang-tse-kiang, by Europeans sometimes erroneously named the Blue River [...]

    My normally well researched world atlas (in Swedish, 1996) has for the upper reaches Yangtze Kiang, then in Sichuan Jinsha Jiang, and finally Changjiang (one word!).

    The semi-official Nationalencyklopedin writes (2007 Internet edition), "Chang Jiang, Långa floden, Changfloden, tidigare Yangzi Jiang, Yang-tse-kiang, Jangtse-kiang".

    Långa floden 'the long river', Changfloden 'the Chang river'; tidigare 'previously'. Obviously, jiang = 'river'.

    I have to digress when in these parts of the world: lots of geographical names are pleonasms, meaning that for example XX river in some language makes XX river River in English. Yarlung Zangbo means the 'Yarlung River' inTibetan. In Chinese, it's Yarlung Zangbo Jiang. I won't be surprised the day I see the Yarlung Zangbo Jiang River mentioned in English. Anyway, In Bangla Desh they say the Jamuna, and to me, it's the Brahmaputra.
     

    gao_yixing

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Thank you all!
    I have to digress when in these parts of the world: lots of geographical names are pleonasms, meaning that for example XX river in some language makes XX river River in English. Yarlung Zangbo means the 'Yarlung River' inTibetan. In Chinese, it's Yarlung Zangbo Jiang. I won't be surprised the day I see the Yarlung Zangbo Jiang River mentioned in English. Anyway, In Bangla Desh they say the Jamuna, and to me, it's the Brahmaputra.
    That's really a good point. In Chinese, we also call the lower reaches of Yarlung Zangbo Jiang as Bulamaputela He, which is a transliteration from Brahmaputra.
     
    Greek:

    The Great Wall: «To Μέγα Σινικό Τείχος» [tɔ ˈme.ɣa si.niˈkɔ ˈti.xɔs] --> The Great Chinese Wall (note that the adj. «σινικό» [si.niˈkɔ] (neut.) --> Chinese, pertaining to China, is a modern construction (1785) and reserved solely for this phrase* < Byz. Gr. masc. nom. pl. «Σῖναι» Sînai̯ --> the Chinese people < Qin state (秦), the name of China in the ancient/mediaeval Greek speaking world).

    *...and the feminine form «σινική» [si.niˈci] is used in relation to the noun «θάλασσα» [ˈθa.la.sa] (fem.) --> sea & «μελάνη» [meˈla.ni] (fem.) --> ink, only. The masc. «σινικός» [si.niˈkɔs] is not used at all:
    «Σινικές θάλασσες» [si.niˈces ˈθa.la.ses] --> Chinese seas (Yellow, East, South)
    «Σινική μελάνη» [si.niˈci meˈla.ni] --> Chinese ink

    Yangtze river: «Ποταμός Γιαγκτσέ» [pɔ.taˈmɔs ʝaŋgˈʦ͡e]
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Czech:

    Velká čínská zeď = lit. great/big Chinese wall;

    Jang-c’-ťiang (we use a Czech transcription for the Chinese names) from 扬子江 , Yángzǐ Jiāng
    (Czech pronunciation roughly ['jaŋk.tsə.'c̟jaŋk], with palatal t [c̟])
    (we do not use a transcription of 長江 / 长江, Cháng Jiāng)
     
    Last edited:

    nimak

    Senior Member
    Macedonian
    Macedonian:

    长城 - The Great Wall of China = Кинескиот Ѕид [ki'nɛski.ɔt 'd͡zid], lit. The-Chinese Wall

    长江 - Yangtze = Јангцекјанг ['jaŋgt͡sɛkjaŋg] or Јангце ['jaŋgt͡sɛ]
     
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    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Catalan:

    长城 - The Great Wall of China = La Gran Muralla (xinesa) [grəmmu'ɾaʎ̟əʃi'nɛzə], lit. The (Chinese) Great Wall

    长江 - Yangtze = el Iangtsé [jaŋg't͡se] or el Iangtse ['jaŋg't͡sə], lit. The Yangtze

    -- Never heard Riu Blau in Catalan, which would be the equivalent to Fleuve Bleu/Río Azul/Fiume Azzurro, though I guess it may feature in some publications. Yet Riu Groc 'Yellow River' for the Huanghe is often used.​
     
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