The hands of (the clock/a clock/clocks) go around clockwise

wanabee

Senior Member
Japanese
Dear all,

The hands of the clock go around clockwise.
The hands of a clock go around clockwise.
The hands of clocks go around clockwise.

I made up the sentences to make a general statement about how the hands of clocks move.
I guess "clocks" refers to clocks in general so the sentence sounds fine to me. But I'm not sure if "the clock" and "a clock" could mean all the clocks.

I would appreciate any comments.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    As a general statement, I would take the second but would omit "around", as it seems obvious that hands go (a)round the clock face.
     

    fdb

    Senior Member
    French (France)
    I would say that all three are pleonastic and rather absurd. "Clock-wise" means "as the hands of a clock move". You could say: "The hands of a clock move from left to right."
     

    bluegiraffe

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I would say that all three are pleonastic and rather absurd. "Clock-wise" means "as the hands of a clock move". You could say: "The hands of a clock move from left to right."
    To me, that sounds absurd. It makes it seem like the hands are swinging left and right rather than moving round.

    I believe all three of your versions are correct Wanabee, however the third does sound a little strange, though not necessarily wrong. I'm afraid I can't explain why it is correct to say "the clock", but it is.
     
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