The helicopter lowers in altitude.

SelvaT

Member
Tamil
The battery power goes reduces and helicopter lowers in altitude.

I wrote the above sentence. When the remote operated helicopter's battery power reduces, you can see the wings of the helicopter slows and the helicopter reduces in height and then slowly it will fall down on the floor. That's what I'm trying to say with the above sentence but I'm not sure whether the phrase "helicopter lowers in altitude" is correct and conveys the meaning correctly. I'm wondering whether there is any better way to say the phrase "helicopter lowers in altitude" without changing the meaning, I mean want to say "It's altitude reduces" or "it's getting down" or ""It's flying height reduces"
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    "Its altitude reduces decreases."

    PS, and you have problems with this: "The battery power goes reduces ..."
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Hmmm... No, it is tautologous and not very good/idiomatic English. If something lowers, by definition its altitude lowers and you have said the same thing twice.
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    There's an increasing tendency, I'd say, to use verbs which are generally transitive (to lower, to reduce) in intransitive senses.

    To lower can very happily mean to move to a less high position. I don't like to see it being used to mean to fall.

    You say you wrote this sentence, Selva: The battery power goes reduces and helicopter lowers in altitude.

    I may have misunderstood you, but I suspect you meant something like: The battery power falls and the helicopter loses height.
     
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