The house <felt><made me feel> hot and stuffy.

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ullas84

Senior Member
turkish
The verb ''feel'' has two different uses

1)To experience a particular physical feeling or emotion

2)İf a situation, event etc feels good, strange,etc that is the emotion or feeling that it gives you.

I have a confusion about the usage ''2'' of verb ''feel''.

Which structure is more idiomatic and more commanly used among native speakers?

a) The house felt hot and stuffy (İn structure of sentence 2)

b) The house made me feel hot and stuffy.

Sentence ''a'' or ''b'' ?
 
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  • ullas84

    Senior Member
    turkish
    a) means that the house was hot and stuffy. b) means that you were hot and stuffy.

    But it's unlikely that we would say we feel stuffy.
    The house felt hot and stuffy = The house made me feel that it is hot and stuffy, (not, made me feel hot and stuffy)

    is it right now?
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    "The house made me feel that it is hot and stuffy" is an odd sentence, partly because we don't know whether "it" is a dummy "it," or refers to "the house."

    If "it" refers to "the house," it's a strange thing to say. We might say "The dark color of the walls made the house seem hot and stuffy," but it's hard to think how the house itself can make you feel that the house is hot and stuffy.

    If "it" is a dummy "it," the sentence could make a little sense (i.e., the house made you feel as though the weather was hot and stuffy), but we don't normally refer to weather as "stuffy."

    In either case, there are better ways to express your meaning.
     

    ullas84

    Senior Member
    turkish
    "The house made me feel that it is hot and stuffy" is an odd sentence, partly because we don't know whether "it" is a dummy "it," or refers to "the house."

    If "it" refers to "the house," it's a strange thing to say. We might say "The dark color of the walls made the house seem hot and stuffy," but it's hard to think how the house itself can make you feel that the house is hot and stuffy.

    If "it" is a dummy "it," the sentence could make a little sense (i.e., the house made you feel as though the weather was hot and stuffy), but we don't normally refer to weather as "stuffy."

    In either case, there are better ways to express your meaning.
    a) The house felt hot and stuffy

    this expression is ok , yes?
     

    ullas84

    Senior Member
    turkish
    A1) İt feels good to have finished a piece of work.

    A2) I feel good to have finished a piece of work

    B1) It felt like I'd had two babies instead of one

    B2) I felt like I'd had two babies instead of one

    Are these sentences(A1-A2 / B1-B2) interchangeable and in the same meaning ?

    Are both sentences grammatically correct?
     
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    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    The first two don't have the same meaning, because the first is a general statement, and the second is an expression of your own experience. [If, for example, a colleague had just completed a difficult project, saying A1 to her would make more snese than saying A2.]

    The second pair is more or less interchangeable.

    We can't proofread or correct sentences, but your use of "I feel/felt" and "It feels/felt" is fine.
     
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