the impact of the motion would be reduced <due to...>

Palabrarista

Member
Español ecuatoriano
Hi everyone,

I have read that "due to" should be immediately preceded by a linking verb, and the verb "reduced" is not one. So, is it ok to use "due to" in this sentence?

"Some liberals also expressed worry that the impact of the motion would be reduced due to the current debate between Hong Kong and Britain on democratization."
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    It looks fine to me, Palabrarista.

    I see many references in here to "rules" that I've never heard of before. As we have nothing as authoritative as a language academy, many of the rules you run across will really be nothing more than suggestions that some self-appointed authority thinks people should follow.

    To be fair, I must acknowledge that I learned my English the natural way, and I didn't have to memorize long lists of rules to begin speaking English. Of course, adults generally don't have the time or the opportunity to learn foreign languages in the natural way that they learned their first language. So you probably need some of the rules you memorized to help you with your English. I see nothing wrong with that. :)
     
    Last edited:

    Palabrarista

    Member
    Español ecuatoriano
    It looks fine to me, Palabrarista.

    I see many references in here to "rules" that I've never heard of before. As we have nothing as authoritative as a language academy, many of the rules you run across will really be nothing more than suggestions that some self-appointed authority thinks people should follow.

    To be fair, I must acknowledge that I learned my English the natural way, and I didn't have to memorize long lists of rules to begin speaking English. Of course, adults generally don't have the time or the opportunity to learn foreign languages in the natural way that they learned their first language. So you probably need some of the rules you memorized to help you with your English. I see nothing wrong with that. :)
    Thank you very much, Owlman5, for your help ! It's good to know that there is some flexibility when it comes to grammar rules, too. :)
     

    Susan Y

    Senior Member
    British English
    I was taught that "due to" should only ever be used with the verb "to be": the floods were due to heavy rain.

    although I am more " flexible" these days I still wince when I hear "due to" used without the verb to be.

    You need to bear in mind that some people will think you are ignorant if you use " due to" as a substitute for "because of". But others won't care. Over to you!
     

    Palabrarista

    Member
    Español ecuatoriano
    I was taught that "due to" should only ever be used with the verb "to be": the floods were due to heavy rain.

    although I am more " flexible" these days I still wince when I hear "due to" used without the verb to be.

    You need to bear in mind that some people will think you are ignorant if you use " due to" as a substitute for "because of". But others won't care. Over to you!
    Thank you Susan Y.:) So, according to what you have learned, the example sentence I have cited at the beginning of the post would be wrong, wouldn't it?
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I was taught that "due to" should only ever be used with the verb "to be": the floods were due to heavy rain.

    although I am more " flexible" these days I still wince when I hear "due to" used without the verb to be.

    You need to bear in mind that some people will think you are ignorant if you use " due to" as a substitute for "because of". But others won't care. Over to you!
    That's interesting, Susan. To me, this sentence is normal: The meeting was cancelled due to rain. "Because of" would be fine in that sentence, but "due to" certainly doesn't make me wince. :)
     
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