the intensity of the gratification <thus> derivable

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park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
To those who have cherished an affection for a faithful and sagacious dog, I need hardly be at the trouble of explaining the nature or the intensity of the gratification thus derivable.
<Source: The Black Cat by Edgar Allan Poe http://poestories.com/read/blackcat>
Here is used "thus" to mean "like this", so I'd like to know whether when "thus" means "in this way/like this", "thus" can modify an adjective.

Thank you in advance for your help.
 
Last edited:
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    I wouldn't say it's modifying the adjective. It can go with verbs, and it can go before or (less commonly) after: you could say 'thus derived', 'derived thus', 'derivable thus'. So it's just an adverb in the clause.
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, entangledbank, for your very helpful answer. :)
    I'd like to know where you mean the following by "the clause."
    : "I need hardly be at the trouble of explaining the nature or the intensity of the gratification thus derivable."
     
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