the investment would be worth it

JungKim

Senior Member
Korean
This is a paragraph from "Remarks by President Trump to the 72nd Session of the United Nations General Assembly":
The United States is one out of 193 countries in the United Nations, and yet we pay 22 percent of the entire budget and more. In fact, we pay far more than anybody realizes. The United States bears an unfair cost burden, but, to be fair, if it could actually accomplish all of its stated goals, especially the goal of peace, this investment would easily be well worth it.
In the boldfaced clause, what exactly does "it" mean?

Also, is it possible to rephrase the clause like this?
it would easily be well worth this investment.
Here, "it" would refer to "to accomplish all of its stated goals, especially the goal of peace".
 
  • Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    This is a common idiom, and probably not worth over-analysing.

    I did something {expensive/dangerous/unconventional}, but {if there is/as there was} a good outcome it {will be/was} well worth it.

    The first "it" is the good outcome and the second "it" is the something done.

    EDIT - although sometimes the order of the "it"s is reversed if one of them is expanded, as in the OP sentence.

    EDIT again. Indeed - and I think the order is wrongly reversed in that sentence.

    the U.S. fails to pay much of what it has committed to pay to the UN.
    Off the topic, but the US does pay what it commits to the UN itself. What it is less likely to pay, for internal political reasons, is full contributions to some of the UN agencies - aid programmes that include abortion and contraceptive services, for example.
     
    Last edited:

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    You wrote.
    "this investment would easily be well worth that money that the U.S. pays"?
    No. "This outcome would be well worth the investment the US has made." This was Trump speaking. He seems to have recurrent problems in stringing words together - conventionally, grammatically and diplomatically.
     

    JungKim

    Senior Member
    Korean
    This was Trump speaking. He seems to have recurrent problems in stringing words together - conventionally, grammatically and diplomatically.
    So you don't find the boldfaced terribly natural.
    What do you think of my suggestion it would easily be well worth this investment in place of the boldfaced clause?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    You are writing a sentence fragment. Which boldfaced clause? You have posted two. Please provide a complete sentence.
     

    JungKim

    Senior Member
    Korean
    You are writing a sentence fragment. Which boldfaced clause? You have posted two. Please provide a complete sentence.
    I was asking the same question that I had posted in the OP. And the boldfaced clause is as noted in the OP.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    If you want help with this, you need to post a complete sentence. I don't see why I should have to jump between posts to read fragments.
     

    JungKim

    Senior Member
    Korean
    If you want help with this, you need to post a complete sentence. I don't see why I should have to jump between posts to read fragments.
    I was simply asking the very question that I had asked in the OP in the same thread.
    And I thought it would be redundant for me to post the same post as OP in the same thread.
    But it's not a hard thing to do, so here you go:
    The United States is one out of 193 countries in the United Nations, and yet we pay 22 percent of the entire budget and more. In fact, we pay far more than anybody realizes. The United States bears an unfair cost burden, but, to be fair, if it could actually accomplish all of its stated goals, especially the goal of peace, this investment would easily be well worth it.
    Is it possible to rephrase the boldfaced clause like this?
    it would easily be well worth this investment.
    Here, "it" would refer to "to accomplish all of its stated goals, especially the goal of peace".
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    All I asked you to do was to provide the sentence as you were proposing it. Even now I have had to do it myself.

    The United States bears an unfair cost burden, but, to be fair, if it could actually accomplish all of its stated goals, especially the goal of peace, it would easily be well worth this investment.
    Is it possible to rephrase the boldfaced clause like this?
    Yes.
     

    JungKim

    Senior Member
    Korean
    All I asked you to do was to provide the sentence as you were proposing it. Even now I have had to do it myself.

    The United States bears an unfair cost burden, but, to be fair, if it could actually accomplish all of its stated goals, especially the goal of peace, it would easily be well worth this investment.
    Ah...now I see what you meant.
    Sorry about not getting what you meant.

    Thank you, Andy.
     
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