The Invisible Japanese Gentlement

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German_lover

Senior Member
Czech
Hello.

Author: Graham Green
Title: The Invisible Japanese Gentlemen
Pages: 61-64

I'm reading this short story about Japanese gentlemen and have some doubts. Maybe someone can help me:

What does it mean:

... when certain weakness and sensitivity were no bar to promotion. - page 61

He uttered a whole paragraph like the mutter from an aviary, ...

I began to change my opinion of him - he had not the Nelson touch. He was doomed to defeat. She came alongside and ranked him fore and aft. - page 62
 
Last edited:
  • RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    It would probably help to add a little context and give the title of the book. The page number helps. They're pretty strict about the rules here.;)

    I'll attempt the first one. Weakness and sensitivity (a euphemism for homosexuality?) would not prevent a person from being promoted either in the army or in the bureaucracy.
     

    German_lover

    Senior Member
    Czech
    It would probably help to add a little context and give the title of the book. The page number helps. They're pretty strict about the rules here.;)

    I'll attempt the first one. Weakness and sensitivity (a euphemism for homosexuality?) would not prevent a person from being promoted either in the army or in the bureaucracy.
    Thank you. you hit the nail on the head.
     

    RedwoodGrove

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    Sorry, I missed the title of the book and page numbers right there in your OP.

    My understanding of "mutter from an aviary" is that it is merely the sound that birds make.

    "She came alongside": This is a tough one. It's a ship that came alongside I assume. Somehow it outdid him or his ship? The verb may refer to forming rows, so the image here would be that the ships were neatly line up next to each other.
     
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