The jelly is caked onto the knife

deltron

Senior Member
English (American)
(I think you can also find variants where it's "caked on to"..I've only used it verbally, so I'm not sure which version is preferred)

Let's imagine you use a knife to spread jelly on your bread. If you clean the knife right away, the jelly is easy to wipe off. If you wait a few hours, the jelly solidifies and is harder to clean off. In this case, we'd say the jelly is caked on..or caked onto the knife. When it's caked on, you really have to scrub to remove the substance.

So, in German I'm not sure how to express this situation. I'd try: Die Marmolade klebt fest am Messer. Or Die Marmolade ist schon an dem Messer festgeklebt.

But to me festkleben is just sticky and difficult to remove, not necessarily hard and difficult to remove. I've seen angebacken as a translation, but that can't be right in the absence of heat. Would a variation of abgehärtet be preferred, such as "Die Marmolade ist schon an dem Messer abgehärtet"?

Thanks for any suggestions!
 
  • JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Die Marmelade klebt fest am Messer. - das kann man sagen, aber das bedeutet nicht unbedingt, dass sie schon lange am Messer klebt.
    "Die Marmelade ist schon an dem Messer abgehärtet" - das geht nicht. "abhärten" hat eine andere Bedeutung.

    Ich würde sagen:
    "Die Marmelade ist (schon) auf dem / am Messer angetrocknet."
     
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    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    I'm not much of a jelly eater, so I haven't really had the need to find a word for it, but off the top of my head I might say (in a rather colloquial way): Die Marmelade hat sich auf dem Messer festgekleistert.

    "Kleister" is that kind of glue that doesn't seem to be much of a glue while wet, but once it's dry it's very hard to get off and therefore the analogy works quite well for me.
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    But to me festkleben is just sticky and difficult to remove, not necessarily hard and difficult to remove. I've seen angebacken as a translation, but that can't be right in the absence of heat. Would a variation of abgehärtet be preferred, such as "Die Marmolade ist schon an dem Messer abgehärtet"?
    You might have thought of "ausgehärted" but that only works for building materials, e.g. glue, concrete, etc.

    "Die Marmelade ist (schon) auf dem Messer angetrocknet."
    And in the next stage it is "eingetrocknet".
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi,
    it is as well a question of style as of content. And words concerning such kitchen issues often are used in family, and often there can be added metaphors.

    So I'm not in doubt that all words which are given by the others are correct.

    I will give my own thoughts.

    I would say:

    Die Marmelade klebt fest am Messer. (The verb is "klebt", it is not "klebt fest", "fest" belongs to "am Messer". The marmalade may be a little bit sticky yet.)
    Style neutral.

    Die Marmelade ist (ja schon) am Messer ausgehärtet. (Style ironically, metaphorically.)

    Die Marmelade ist am Messer angetrocknet. (It started to become hard, the surface is dried, but parts are just sticky, style neutral.)

    Die Marmelade ist am Messer eingetrocknet. (It is hard and dry. Style neutral)

    If I am angry or in an ironic mood, I would use "ausgehärtet", else I would use "eingetrocknet".
    This does not mean that the other sentences are wrong. It depends on the exact state, and it is easier to select a word when you see the situation.

    Marmalade and jam - both may be "Marmelade" in German.
    Jelly is Gelee. (As far as I know and found in the dictionary.)
     
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    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Was sagen die Fachleute?

    Siehe hier:
    - Wenn Speisereste an der Klinge angetrocknet sind, werden Schwamm und Seife unabdingbar.
    - Vorreiniger speziell für das Entfernen von angetrockneten Verschmutzungen
    - Kennen Sie das, wenn Speisereste richtig hartnäckig angetrocknet sind und sich sehr schwer lösen lassen?
     
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    L'irlandais

    Senior Member
    Ireland: English-speaking ♂
    Well not quite Frank. While I do accept Hutschi’s point that in Germany no distinction is made between jam and marmalade. Jelly in the US is what is called jam in the UK. Marmalade is citrus fruit based, while jams use all other fruits, or soft fruits. So yes AmE jelly = DE marmalade, but AmE jelly = jam (Rest of World). As long as my donut has raspberry in it, you can call it marmalade if you like.
    wiki said:
    Marmalade generally refers to a fruit preserve made from the juice and peel of citrus fruits boiled with sugar and water.
    BrE Jelly = Wackelpudding according to Langenscheidt Online Wörterbücher
    or Gelée im Französisch
     
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    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    For this American, jelly is Gelee (clear, no fruit bit in it) and jam is everything else. I know marmalade as a specific British concoction that has citrus fruit rind in it. It used to be fashionable to buy it once in order to get the fancy jar to use as a pencil and pen holder.
     
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