The kids gab.

ting123456

Member
Chinese
I am going to explain the meaning of gab to Chinese children. Is it correct to use this example:

"The kids gab."
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    "The kids gab" does not carry any information about what the children are doing, so it is not a very good example. NB "to gab" is very informal and somewhat old-fashioned; it is the sort of word that you might remember but not the sort of word that you would use.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I am going to explain the meaning of gab to Chinese children. Is it correct to use this example:

    "The kids gab."
    This is very unnatural. The word "gab" is mostly used as a personal criticism. "Oh stop gabbing on - you are so boring"

    The best known phrase is "gift of the gab", which means that someone has the ability to talk a lot. Depending on the context, this phrase can be somewhat complimentary or it can be sarcastic.
     

    ting123456

    Member
    Chinese
    Thank you for your help!

    The details are as follows: I am teaching Chinese preschool children to learn English cvc words.
    In order to make it easier for Chinese preschool children to understand the meaning of the word, I designed a simple sentence for each cvc word (suitable for Chinese children to understand) and a picture for the word.

    For example, the word "gab", the sentence I intend to use is: the kids gab.


    I want to use this sentence to express the meaning: the two children are chatting.


    The picture is:
     

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    elroy

    Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    There are many other cvc words you can use that are widespread in everyday speech and easily illustratable.

    dog, cat, bug, rat, man, bag, pig, rag, van, bus, nut, pen, hat, bat, pan, fat, pot, top, mop, map, cap, cop, red, …

    Get rid of “gab.”
     

    ting123456

    Member
    Chinese
    There are many other cvc words you can use that are widespread in everyday speech and easily illustratable.

    dog, cat, bug, rat, man, bag, pig, rag, van, bus, nut, pen, hat, bat, pan, fat, pot, top, mop, map, cap, cop, red, …

    Get rid of “gab.”

    thanks! but the "gab" is in the ab word family(cab lab tab gab) , the ab family has only 4 words, so I didn't want to remove it.

    But according to the suggestion , I decided to use "the gift of the gab" as the sentence:
    The kid has the gift of the gab.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Sorry, Ting, but this is daft. You say "the ab word family(cab lab tab gab) has only 4 words, so I didn't want to remove it."

    In fact it has nine words (bab, cab, dab, fab, gab, jab, lab, nab, tab) and the ones I've put in bold are far more useful than gab. (There's also Queen Mab, which is a phrase I probably use more often than gift of the gab.)

    Why waste children's time teaching words that they will almost never use, just to comply with a formula?

    [Cross-posted.]
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Ting is meticulous because she asked here.

    I spent 10+ years here for this reason too.

    I thought she used a textbook (she had to use) and there were only four “ab” family words. And “jab” is a good option.

    Thanks a lot, teachers.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    None of which are cvc.
    I suppose it depends which definition of consonant you use. One possibility is that it is a letter of the English alphabet. Another is that it is a speech sound that is not a vowel. Consonant - Definition, Meaning & Synonyms

    In Non-rhotic British English, the words "drab", grab", and "crab" fit this definition I think. This could provoke an extended off-topic debate I suppose.

    However, I must admit that I missed the cvc requirement as it appeared part way through the thread. I stand corrected.
     

    ting123456

    Member
    Chinese
    The question I ask comes from some of my experience and insights in Phonics teaching.

    It is very difficult for Chinese preschool children to master the meaning of words. So I plan to match a picture for each word, so that the children can understand the meaning of the word when they see the picture.
    However, some words are difficult to express in pictures. For example, this word: jig.

    Many of the words in the original Phonics textbooks also come with simple photos, but the grading system of these textbooks is not suitable for Chinese children. That's why I plan to redesign a simpler set of learning materials for my students. This is a very huge and time-consuming project. Fortunately, I found this place, which made me more confident to do it.

    Thanks !
     

    ting123456

    Member
    Chinese
    Ting is meticulous because she asked here.

    I spent 10+ years here for this reason too.

    I thought she used a textbook (she had to use) and there were only four “ab” family words. And “jab” is a good option.

    Thanks a lot, teachers.

    I want to try my best to avoid "Chinglish" in my class. This is a good place to learn a language. It's very good.
     

    ting123456

    Member
    Chinese
    Thank you very much! I consider listing the cvc words I plan to use in teaching. Teachers can help me eliminate some words that are not commonly used. This can prevent children from wasting time learning words that they don't need.
    Another word you need to ditch.
     
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