The language as an acquisition typically human.

gockab

Senior Member
Polish
Hi everybody,

I want to say that the language is something that only people achieved, and this is their "benefit", their "acquisition". Is the following sentence correct:
"The language as an acquisition typically human."?
 
  • morzh

    Banned
    USA
    Russian
    I am not sure one could use "acquisition" here.

    How about: "So far only humans developed language as a way to communicate". (have to state I don't share this opinion :))
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    "The language as an acquisition typically human." That is not a sentence; it has no verb.
     

    gockab

    Senior Member
    Polish
    "The language as an acquisition typically human." That is not a sentence; it has no verb.
    It's a title so I think it is ok without a verb.
    How about:
    "Language as a typically human phenomenon" (or "Language - a typically human phenomenon)
    or
    "Language is a typically human discovery" (or "Language - a typically human discovery)

    It is a translation of a Polish sentence and I don't want its sense to be too different from that of the original sentence. At the same time I want it to sound natural.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    "The language as an acquisition typically human" doesn't work for me, gockab.

    "Language as a typically human acquisition"
    might work....
     

    Albertovna

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    The word "acquisition" does not fit. "Language acquisition" is a term used in language teaching and means the natural process of mastering a language, especially your mother tongue. A child takes language in like a sponge, absorbs it, and, as a result, "acquires" it.

    "Phenomenon" is good. Some more suggestions:

    Language is a uniquely human attribute.
    Language is the prerogative of human beings.
    Language is a human-specific ability.
    Language is unique/peculiar/specific to humans.
     
    Last edited:

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    Two points seem to deserve consideration.
    (1)
    'The word "acquisition" does not fit.'
    Surely this depends on your point of view. A creationist might say language was not acquired by the human race, but was a gift of God. An evolutionist might well say language was acquired by the human race in the course of its development.

    (2) 'Typically'. The original post does not claim that language or its acquisition is uniquely human, merely typical of humans. You could hold the view that language is typical of humans while still accepting that bees, apes, whales and many other species also have language.
     
    If the point of the article is that "language is something that only people achieved," then I don't think "typically" is the right word. It says that language is typical of human behavior, which may be true but is sort of beside the point. I think "uniquely" works better. And "discovery" doesn't work - humans didn't discover language, we invented it. In fact:

    Language - A Uniquely Human Invention

    is a pretty good title, if you believe that only humans have language.
     

    wandle

    Senior Member
    English - British
    I have an exactly opposite impression. The person writes, "I want to say that the language is something that only people achieved."
    Sorry, I overlooked that rather obvious point.
    It follows that the poster's choice of 'typically' is inappropriate.
    For gockab's meaning, then, it ought to be 'uniquely' or 'exclusively'.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Language - Uniquely human development

    I think it can be considered unique if you define is as a system with a grammar. Otherwise it is known as animal communication.
     
    Last edited:
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