the last or last weekend/at the last weekend

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Gkl

New Member
Swedish
Don't know why but always had a problem with those. Tried googling this but unable to find any info. So can you say: last weekend/the last weekend/at the last weekend/in the last weekend? If yes, what is the difference? Personally, I would go for "last weekend" in general, the last weekend (= specific) I worked was three years ago but with at/in?
 
  • Gkl

    New Member
    Swedish
    Sorry, a bit unclear! Is it possible to say "at the last weekend" or "in the last weekend"? Both sound strange, I think. I'd just say "last weekend" but I am not a native speaker, obviously :)
     

    Gkl

    New Member
    Swedish
    At the last weekend I did lots of things.
    Can't come up with an example with "in the last weekend" since I thought this expression was unidiomatic.
     

    GMF1991

    Senior Member
    English (UK, Suffolk)
    For that example, you would just say "last weekend", the others are unidiomatic.

    You can say "in the last week" to mean "during the past 7 days"
     

    Gkl

    New Member
    Swedish
    That's what I thought. Maybe it is possible to
    say "at the last weekend of May". But "in the last weekend of May"? Is that ever used?
     

    Culturilla

    Senior Member
    Castellano, España
    "The last weekend" is a phrase that Spanish speakers use a lot to talk about what they did during the weekend.

    They normally say things like: "The last weekend I went to the cinema" (or "the last month I went to London"). To me, using "the" in this sentence implies that you're talking about a specific weekend that marks the end of a period of time. Like "Last year we spent three weeks Nashville. The last weekend we visited the Ryman Auditorium". Or, let's say... nearing the end of the summer holidays: "There we go, the last weekend".

    They also say things like "The next Monday I'm going to Dublin" which sounds a bit odd to me. This happens because they inadvertently translate from their mother tongue which requires the definite article before days of the week.
     
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