the last part, which is the essence [comma]

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Sun14

Senior Member
Chinese
Hello, my friend!

This is the original sentence:
"The transition is set to draw the reader’s attention to the last part, which is the essence of the poem. "

Since "which" refers to the nouns("last part"), is it appropriate to separate the sentence with a comma.

How about this version:

The transition is set to draw the reader’s attention to the last part which is the essence of the poem.

Thank you!
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Since "which" refers to the nouns("last part"), is it appropriate to separate the sentence with a comma.
    I think it is.

    The transition is set to draw the reader’s attention to the last part which is the essence of the poem.
    I see no reason to omit the comma in this sentence.
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    Without the comma, you have "part which is the essence", and the sentence refers to the last such part.

    With the comma, "which" might refer to the whole previous clause, so I suggest keeping the comma but leaving out "which is".

    Alternatively, you could keep the comma and change "which" to "which part", but I prefer the succinct version without "which is".
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I much prefer the original sentence, including the comma and "which is":
    The transition is set to draw the reader’s attention to the last part, which is the essence of the poem.
     
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