The longest waiter to work here?

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  • bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I would guess that the writer is ineffectually trying to say that "John is the waiter who has been working here the longest," meaning that he has been working at that restaurant/bar for a longer period than any other waiter currently employed in that establishment.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Sam, I think there are two different questions here.

    (1) Can we work out what the writer of the original sentence was intending to convey?

    Answer: yes, we can, with some effort

    (2) is this the way a native speaker of English would ask the question?

    Answer: no.

    Bibliolept's "John is the waiter who has been working here the longest," or blini's "John is the longest-serving waiter working here" convey the message best.
     

    Moglet

    Senior Member
    UK
    British/Hiberno-English
    Hello amigos!:)

    John is the longest waiter to work here.

    What does it mean? he´s the tallest waiter there?

    Thanks,

    Sam:cool:
    Hi Sam,

    To my understanding, grammatically the sentence is saying that the waiter is 'long' (which tends to imply 'tall')!

    In reference to the (better) sentence:

    "John is the longest-serving waiter working here."

    I would suggest refining it to:

    "John is the longest-serving waiter here."

    In the context, "serving" refers to the time that he has served in his current employment, so technically "working" is redundant.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Moglet's right: you don't need working

    John is the longest-serving waiter here:tick:
     
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